Author Topic: #0170/0171: Robservations 09/19/01: Laura, Saboteur, Dream-Weaver  (Read 1732 times)

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Offline ROBINV

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#0170/0171: Robservations 09/19/01: Laura, Saboteur, Dream-Weaver
« on: September 18, 2001, 07:46:08 PM »
Episode #170 - This night at Collinwood may prove to be the most terrifying for this is the night that the living will try to contact the dead. Preparations are underway for that moment, the moment when one world will reach out to the other--the seance.

Mrs. Johnson watches as Vicki and Carolyn set up chairs around a table in the drawing room. You certainly picked a perfect night for it, she remarks, then leaves the room. Dr. Guthrie should be here any minute, Vicki tells Carolyn. I don't know how I allowed myself to become involved in this, says Vicki. I've been asking myself the same question, says Vicki, do you think we should call it all off?--I have a strange feeling bout, I just think it's something we shouldn't be doing--don't you think we should take a minute to make sure we want to go through with it? Please don't start talking like that, says Carolyn--if we start talking like that, we may never know what's wrong with my mother. I know that we must have a seance, says Vicki, but...all the time I keep getting this awful feeling that something's going to happen to me! She stands by the window silhouetted in lightning, fear on her face.

I wish you wouldn't talk that way, says Carolyn, the seance may come to mean nothing at all. Normally I'd be skeptical, says Vicki, but I've seen Josette with my own eyes--and I'm sure that she'll respond to the call. I've lived here all my life, says Carolyn, and I've never seen her--I never even really believed the stories I heard about her, except when I was a little girl. That's why it's so strange that I should see her, says Vicki, when I'm not even a member of the family. (well...?) That is strange, agrees Carolyn. So many strange things have happened since I came here to Collinwood, says Vicki. They're probably just coincidence, Carolyn assures her. Josette is no coincidence, says Vicki, anyway, it's more than that--it's some kind of a sensitivity I seem to have. Mrs. Johnson comes in with the candelabra Carolyn asked for--where would she like her to put it? Right there, please, says Carolyn, and Mrs. Johnson places it and the candles on the table. I don't like this foolishness, says Sarah--there's enough foolishness going on around here--if your mother knew about this... The reason we're doing this is to try to help my mother, Carolyn reminds her. I only hope it works, says Sarah--do you have enough chairs? Four is all we need, says Vicki--I think we have everything. I want to know what I'm supposed to do with all this business going on? asks Mrs. Johnson. I'd like you to be with David, says Vicki--he's asleep, but I'd appreciate it if you'd stay with him. Yes, says Carolyn, it wouldn't be good for him to walk in in the middle of a seance. And please don't mention a word of what's going on down here to him, cautions Vicki--we haven't said anything about it to him. I'll try not to even think about it, vows Sarah. And one more thing, says Vicki, no matter what happens or what you might here, don't leave David. I won't budge from the room, Sarah assures her--is there anything else you want? If you could bring the coffee, please, says Carolyn. Right away, says Sarah, exiting. Can you imagine, says Vicki to Carolyn, if David got wind of what was gong on--he'd want to join in the seance--she helps Carolyn put the candles into the candelabra--he's already so susceptible to Josette--she's probably try to make contact through him--I wouldn't want him to go through that kind of experience. What kind of experience? Asks Roger, entering the room--the seance?--you're not thinking of calling it off, are you? No, says Vicki. We're definitely going ahead with it, say Carolyn--we're just about ready--and Dr. Guthrie should be here any minute. Oh, he'll be here, says Roger, but Josette may be the sugar baby--I wonder if she'll make it over in all this storm. (???) I wish you wouldn't talk like that, says Vicki. Really, he says, you're taking this thing much too seriously--you act as if she's here already! There's a possibility that she may make contact tonight, Vicki tells him.
Possibility, repeats Roger, I doubt that very much--what is the excuse David is always making?--if anyone other than himself tries to see Josette? That she only appears to one person at a time, says Vicki. Yes, that's right, says Roger. It's true, says Vicki, because I've seen her myself, and I was alone then. So you have, says Roger--how many are there going to be tonight? Four, replies Vicki. Then I have a feeling that Josette's silence might get the best of her, remarks Roger--what an incredible bore this party is to be. Then why are you here? asks Vicki resentfully. Because I'm going to give Guthrie the full benefit of the doubt, says Roger, and then when his face is red with failure, I'm going to toss him out into the storm. (how hospitable, Roger!)

Mrs. Johnson is carrying the tray of coffee into the foyer and sets it down to answer Guthrie's knock at the door. He closes his umbrella, remarking that another minute and he would have gone under for the third time--where does this weather come from? She offers to help him off with his coat. Where are the others? he asks. They must be upstairs, she tells him, they'll be down in a few minutes. Sorry I'm tracking the place up, he says. Well, she says, floor needs to be scrubbed anyway. I'll just go in here and wait for them, he says, heading into the drawing room. Make yourself at home, she says. I see you're all set up, he says. I think so, she agrees, bringing in the coffee--do you need anything else? This table looks fine, he says, placing a box on it and opening it, and four chairs--I think everything's here. I made fresh coffee, she says, would you like some? Yes, thanks, please, he says, just black. He begins setting up a tape recorder, saying he'll give it a quick test. What is that? she asks. A tape recorder, he says, I want to record everything at the seance tonight. You sure seem confident, she says. I am, he says proudly. You do this kind of thing very much? she asks. I don't know, he says, are you asking if I go around doing this? You seem to know what you're doing, so I guess you do, she says. He turns on the recorder and asks if she'd like to say something. I'd like to say something, all right, she says disapprovingly, but I won't.
That's good, he says, now I'll just replay it. He rewinds and their past two sentences are repeated. Mrs. Johnson is amazed. You sound good, he says. That doesn't sound a bit like me, she says. The machine's working and I'll just put it over here--he sets it on another table--I think we're all set. Strictly off the record, he says, picking up his cup of coffee, what would you like to say about all this. I'll tell you, doctor, she says, I think it's a terrible thing--I think the dead are dead and should be allowed to rest--what you're doing is something not natural. Don't you think it's possible that we might learn something from them? he asks. Only thing we'd learn about from them is death, she says--and who needs that? It's possible we might learn something also about life, he says. I doubt that, says Sarah. Vicki enters and greets Dr. Guthrie--do you have everything you need? We're all set, ready to go, he says, sipping his coffee. The others will be down in a minute, she says, and David's asleep. Good, says Sarah, and exits. Did Mrs. Johnson bother you? asks Vicki. I've been dealing with skeptics ever since I began this work, he says--we're participating in an experiment that could produce fantastic results--we're going to try to bridge the gap between two worlds--to a work that's considered unreachable--we hope that we'll be contacted by someone from that world--Josette Collins--and that tonight she'll come into this room and through one of us, will say something too startling to believe.
Thunder booms as he and Vicki gaze at the tables and chairs.

Vicki lights the candles. We must keep in mind that experience may be a very gratifying one, he says, we may be able to understand the reason for Mrs. Stoddard's trance. Carolyn enters and greets Peter. My uncle will be along in a moment, she says, I must warn you, his attitude is not the best. Mr. Collins' attitude doesn't bother me in the least, he assures her. Good luck to all of us, she says, on this occasion. I hear someone toasting, quips Roger, but I don't see anyone drinking--good evening, Doctor. Peter greets Roger and says if they're all ready, they can begin. I'm as ready as I'll ever be, says Carolyn. Vicki says she is, too, continuing to light the candles. Let's get it over with, agrees Roger. If you'll all sit at the table, I'll turn out the light, says Guthrie. He closes the double doors and turns out all the lights, then turns on the recorder. How very restful, remarks Roger. Make yourselves as comfortable as possible, advises Guthrie. He sits across from Roger. Vicki and Carolyn face each other. Our object here tonight, says Peter, is to summon the ghost of Josette Collins--now we're all reasonably certain that she's been trying to communicate with us (Vicki looks nervous)--now we feel if we can create the proper atmosphere and right state of mind, that she will come into this room and speak to us--she might either appear to one of us or use one of us as a medium, to speak through. Well I certainly hope she uses you, doctor, it will be something to remember, hearing her voice coming out of your mouth. (LOL!) Mr. Collins, says Peter sternly, if you want to make a joke of this, I'd be very grateful if you'd leave the room now. I'm sorry, says Roger, please proceed. Thank you, says Peter--now, let's place our hands flat on the table. (We get an overhead view.) Spread your fingers and make a circle of the fingers by touching the fingers of those next to you. We must keep this circle unbroken at all times...that's good--now the electricity of thought has been set in motion so that if will flow through us, making our minds as one--let us begin to concentrate--we must repeat over and over in our minds, "Josette Collins...Josette Collins...Josette Collins..." Thunder rolls. Everyone concentrates. Josette...Josette, I'm calling you, says Peter. Vicki's face changes. Josette? asks Peter, come to us, Josette. Vicki begins to moan. Vicki, says Carolyn. Leave her alone, hisses Peter, contact is being made--concentrate on Josette. They all watch Vicki. Come to us, Josette, says Peter. Ohhhhh, says Vicki, ohhhhh! There's a presence here, says Peter, a definite influence. Carolyn looks terrified as Vicki continues to moan, louder and louder. It seems to be getting closer, closer, says Peter. The doors blow open. Carolyn screams. A hooded figure stands there.
Guthrie picks up a candle and holds it on front of the person's face. It's Laura!

Mrs. Collins, says Peter. What is it? asks Vicki, what is it? I'm sorry, says Laura, I didn't mean to interrupt. The circle is broke, says Peter. Roger rises from his chair. Come in, please, says Peter. You said you weren't coming, says Roger. I wasn't, says Laura, but as you can see, I changed my mind. I need a drink, says Roger, and pours one. What happened, Peter asks Vicki. I don't know, she says, I remember calling for Josette, and then I had a strange feeling that I was in a long corridor--and all of your voices were echoes--that's all. Excellent, he says, it's happening faster than I though it would--it means that Josette is eager to respond to us, she wants to communicate with us, there's some sort of urgency involved--we must begin again. Laura listens intently. I'm not sure Vicki's up to it, says Carolyn. Are you? Peter asks Vicki. I don't know, says Vicki. Obviously, says Laura, she isn't. You must, insists Peter, she was so close, she was almost here, you must. Vicki looks at Laura, gulps. All right, she agrees. Good girl, says Peter--Mrs. Collins, I'm very glad you're here--will you join us? Yes, says Laura, sitting down. Mr. Collins... says Peter to Roger. Then you are going to do it again? Roger asks. Yes, says Peter, of course we are--you'll be with us, won't you?--or are you still skeptical? No, I'm not, says Roger. Then if you'll bring a chair and turn out the lights, please, says Peter. Carolyn closes the doors and Roger caries over another chair and sits down with the others. Let us begin again, says Peter--place your hands on the table as before and make a circle again. Laura holds back her hands. Mrs. Collins, says Peter, if you'll let the tips of your fingers touch those of the person next to you--there, that's it. Now, let us begin to concentrate together--one thought and one thought only in our minds--to bring someone from the dead over to us--we will concentrate on that one dead person--we will fill our minds with Josette Collins...I shall begin to call out to the world of the dead--Josette--Josette--Josette Collins, we're calling you, Josette, come back to us, Josette, come back to us. Laura fixes an ugly gaze on Vicki.

At the Old House, where debris is scattered everywhere, Josette walks down from her portrait, turns to look at the painting, then continues on.
Laura looks around nervously. We're calling you, Josette, intones Peter, Josette, we're calling you! Vicki begins to moan again. Vicki! calls Carolyn. She's going into a trance, says Peter. Laura looks terrified. Speak to us, Peter tells Josette. I smell perfume in the room! announces Carolyn--it's jasmine. Vicki moans. Josette's perfume, says Carolyn. She's here, she's with us, says Peter excitedly--speak to us! Vicki speaks in French. She's speaking French! Says Roger. Vicki doesn't know French! Says Carolyn. Then it must be Josette, says Peter. Vicki continues to speak French (which I can't understand after taking it 5 years). What does it mean? asks Carolyn as Vicki babbles on. Laura listen, angry. Vicki speaks of fire, I can understand that much, and seems very upset. Laura's eyes widen.
She's about to reveal the name of the person who is a danger when she screams and passes out on the table.

NOTES: Whew, I'd forgotten what a dilly DS' first seance was! I wonder if something Laura did made Vicki faint that way. She sure was nervous over whatever it is Vicki was saying--did she understand it?

You've got to love Mrs. Johnson and her attitude about all this. Of course she wouldn't go along with I, being the religious woman she professes to be. Messing with the dead is never a good idea in Mrs. J's estimation.

Roger was a hoot, as always, making his droll, cutting remarks about the seance. At least after their first attempt, he was willing to try again, and now seemed to be a believer.

I think Laura showed up hoping to do something to sabotage the seance. Vicki might have revealed something dangerous about her, after all, and she had to cover her ass. I was surprised she didn't try to break contact during the seance. When I first saw this ep, I was taking French, and probably understood at least some of what Vicki said. Now I only picked up a word or two. You don't use it, you lose it.


Episode #171 - This night at Collinwood is the most terrifying night of my life. A seance is being held, and I am about to be contacted by the dead.

We repeat all of yesterday's ending. Peter and Carolyn rush to the unconscious Vicki's aid. Carolyn calls to her. Put on the lights, Laura tells her husband. Yes, of course, he says, and does so. Is she?... asks Carolyn. She's going to be all right, says Peter, she just fainted. We really should give her something, says Laura--are there any smelling salts in the house? she asks Roger. No, but there's brandy, he replies, that should do her good. She's coming out of it, Peter announces. What happened? asks Vicki. You fainted, says Peter. Roger brings a glass to Vicki and tells her to "take this." Are you all right? asks Carolyn. I don't know, says Vicki--what happened? You were speaking French, says Carolyn. I don't speak French! says Vicki. (we all had to take foreign language in school; which one did Vicki take if not French?) It was Josette speaking through you, says Carolyn, I smelled her perfume. What did I say? asks Vicki. I didn't understand a word of it, says Carolyn. You speak French, Laura, says Roger, what was she saying?  It was so confusing, I really didn't pay attention, lies Laura. Fortunately, I did, says Peter--it was very disjointed--you mentioned a person, someone who sleeps without sleeping and dreams without dreaming--and then you said there was an innocent child, a boy, in grave danger. David? asks Vicki. How could Davie be in danger? asks Roger. I don't know, says Peter, she didn't say--she spoke of fire--you spoke of fires that had occurred during the centuries, and that there would be another one soon. Laura looks disturbed. Did she says where? asks Caroyln. No, he says, but she said more--you said there's an evil presence in this house and you started to name this person, and that's when you screamed and fainted--I think some hostile force prevented you from saying more. Laura looks relieved. I don't understand any of this, do you? she asks Roger. No, he says, but I don't like it. Neither do I, she says. Can you remember what you were trying to tell us? Peter asks Vicki. I can't remember anything, she replies--I remember starting the seance, but after that, everything's blank. I hate to put you through anymore of this, says Peter, but if you could remember the name of the person, it might tell us everything--if you could help us by telling us that. I'll try, agrees Vicki--I was sitting here, and we were calling Josette, and then something came over me--it was as though I was moved to a dark, empty place--I could hear sounds, but I wasn't afraid, that was the strangest part--until there was fire. Fire? asks Peter. Yes, she says, it was everywhere, all around me, falling out of the skies, and I couldn't get out, or move, and then I was burning, burning alive, I was burning!--Vicki stops, hysterical. Carolyn holds her, assuring her that nothing is going to happen to her. Peter holds Vicki's wrist. You're safe, Carolyn promises the crying Vicki. This is no place for her to be, insists Roger, Carolyn, take her to her room. All right, says Carolyn. Peter pushes his glasses on the bridge of his nose with frustration. Would you like some help? Laura offers Carolyn. The latter looks hard at her aunt and says no, I can manage--come on, Vicki--and leads her away. Well, I take it the entertainment is over, Roger tells Peter. Yes, there's no more we can accomplish tonight, he replies. In that case, I'll take you back to the cottage, says Roger tells Laura. Fine, she says, I want to talk to you anyway. Will you be here when I get back? Roger asks Peter. Yes, he says. Good--I have a great deal to say to you, says Roger, in a voice that bodes ill for the doctor. Roger and Laura leave. Guthrie stands there, forehead creased. He rewinds the tape in the recorder. He plays back what Vicki says during the seance, specifically her attempt to name the person responsible.
He bites on the earpiece of his eyeglasses, thinking hard.

Cottage - Roger and Laura enter. Then you agree with me? she asks him. Completely, he says, I want Guthrie away from here as much as you do. She sits. When do you plan on telling him to leave? she asks. Tonight, he says--he promised he would leave after the seance, I'll see that he keeps his word. You might get opposition from Carolyn and Vicki, she warns. I'll handle the girls, don't worry about that, he assures her--Laura, don't laugh, but do you suppose, I mean is it humanly possible, there could be anything in all of this--is it possible Josette spoke to us through Vicki? You're not going to start believing in ghosts and the supernatural now, are you? she asks. No, he says uncertainly, of course I don't believe in it--I'm a sane man and intend to remain sane--still, it was so odd! Vicki was frightened, so frightened she became hysterical, says Laura--that's all there was to it. How did she talk about death and fire? he asks. Who knows? says Laura, she was babbling, she might have said anything. But in French, he says, Vicki doesn't speak French.
I'm sure that there's some logical explanation, she says. Yes, he says, I'm not going to think about it tonight--I'm going to forget about it as soon as I can (sure, be Scarlett O'Hara, Roger). He looks at her once before leaving, and she looks back.

Vicki and Carolyn are in Vicki's room, gazing out the window at the storm. Vicki's in night clothes. I wish that thunder and lightning would stop, Vicki says. You should be lying down, suggests Carolyn. I can't stop thinking about what Dr. Guthrie said, Vicki tells her, those words that I spoke--boy--it must have been David. Yes, says Carolyn, David must be in some kind of danger--he's the one she's trying to protect--but what danger? I spoke of fire, says Vicki, fires that were and fires that are to be--perhaps fire is the threat to David--perhaps he's going to be trapped in fire! Where will the fire be? wonders Carolyn, in this house?--where? I don't know, says Vicki. At least we know one thing--we know who's causing these things to happen. We don't know, insists Vicki. Oh, come on, says Carolyn, be honest. I suspect, that's all, says Vicki. You almost said her name, Carolyn reminds her, and it's a name we both know as well as we know our own--Laura Murdoch Collins.

Laura Collins is responsible for what happened to my mother, says Carolyn, and she's going to do something terrible to David, I know it. But why would she do something terrible to David--she loves him! says Vicki. I don't believe that, says Carolyn, I don't believe that woman is capable of loving anything or anyone. Someone knocks. Carolyn asks who it is. It's Peter, who has come up to see how Vicki feels. I'm fine, thank you, she assures him. Are you sure? he asks. Yes, much better, she says. I'm terribly sorry to put you through this terrifying experience tonight, he says, sitting beside her on the bed. What stopped Vicki from telling us the name of the person? asks Carolyn. Another force, he says, a force whose powers are at least the equal of Josette's. It's Laura, says Carolyn, it has to be. I wouldn't go as far as that, he says. But you must suspect her! says Carolyn. All we know, he says, is that there's a definite force present in this house, and its powers are hostile--that alone makes for a major breakthrough in knowledge. What happens next? asks Carolyn. I'm not sure, he says, but if we could communicate with Josette again, directly. You mean you want to hold another seance? asks Vicki hesitantly. Yes I do, he says. She rises, looking fearful. There are also hostile forces at work tonight, he says, forces that kept Josette from telling us what she wanted to--now if we remove those forces. You mean hold another seance without my Aunt Laura? suggests Carolyn. Yes, he says, and perhaps hold it at the Old House, where Josette's powers seem to be the greatest.
Couldn't you hold it without me? asks Vicki. Josette used you as her medium, her instrument of communication, he says, we can't be sure she'll do that with anyone else. I do want to help, says Vicki, but...she wanders to the window. Thunder booms. The second seance is only an idea, a suggestion, he says, I wouldn't make you go through with it, except as a last resort--I promise you. Thank you, she says. Why don't you go to bed, he says, you look exhausted. I am quite tired, she admits. Good night, I'll see you in the morning, Peter says. Good night, she says. He leaves. Try to get a good night's sleep, says Carolyn. I will, says Vicki. Carolyn, too, leaves. Vicki closes her door and goes to look out the window, which she closes.

Down in the drawing room, Roger opens the window. Carolyn and Peter enter. Ah, the good doctor, says Roger, just the man I wanted to see--I have something to say to you. What it is? asks Peter. One word--goodbye, says Roger. (weakest link?) It's been quite an experience knowing you, says Roger--an experience I'm not likely to forget. He pours a drink. I'm not leaving, says Peter. But the seance is over, Roger reminds him, you said you would leave afterwards. I meant I would leave if the seance wasn't a success--but it was, says Peter. You gave me your word, says Roger--are you going to break it? You misunderstood me, says Peter. He can't leave now, says Carolyn, we're just starting to get someplace! I will not stand for a repetition of tonight, says Roger. This is not your house, it's mine, says Carolyn (you go, girl!). Oh, we're back to that, are we? asks Roger, annoyed. That's right, she says, and you can't stop me from allowing Dr. Guthrie to come here if I want him here
--and I do! Roger looks at Carolyn, then Peter, who looks evenly back at him with perhaps a flare of triumph in his gaze.

Roger and Carolyn argue in front of the fire. No, says Carolyn, the answer is no, do you understand me? I grow weary arguing with you, he says. Then don't, she advises. This man is more than a psychologist checking on the background of your mother's illness, insists Roger, no ordinary psychologist stages a seance. You may scoff, she says, but that seance tonight worked--Josette Collins appeared to us through Vicki. Did she really? asks Roger. You were here, you saw and heard it! says Carolyn. I don't know what I saw and heard, he says, what's more, I don't want to know! Do you know the trouble with you, is, she you're frightened, even more frightened than I am--but you're trying to cover it over by being cynical. Fear can be a healthy thing, he says, a strong dose of it wouldn't do you any harm. I'm afraid, all right, she says, but I'm not going to stop trying to help my mother--and if you cared about her, you'd feel the same way. I do care about her, he says, she's my sister, but is this the way to help her? Dr. Guthrie is the only help I have, she says, the only person who might be able to help her--I'm not going to send him away. He represents a pathetically pale hope, says Roger. I said I wasn't going to argue with you, she says, and I'm not--I'm going to bed. That's the most sensible decision you've made all evening, he says. Are you staying up? she asks. No, I'm going to follow you, he says--I'm worn out. Good night, she says, and leaves. Roger glances up at the clock. It's 12:10.

Vicki's bedside clock reads 2:15. She's asleep, but awakens with a start. Who's in here? she asks--who is it?--I know somebody's in here. In the corner stands Laura. I startled you, didn't I? she asks, I'm sorry. What do you want? asks Vicki. I just came by to see if you were all right, says Laura--I didn't mean to waken you. I didn't hear you come in, says Vicki, suspicious. Of course not, says Laura, you were sleeping. Yes, says Vicki, of course. Are you all right? asks Laura. Yes I'm fine, replies Vicki. Can I get you anything? asks Laura. No thank you, nothing, says Vicki. I was worried about you, says Laura. Were you? asks Vicki, gazing at her doubtfully. Of course, says Laura, that terrible experience you had tonight--I certainly hope you never have to go through anything like that again. I hope not, too, agrees Vicki. You know something, says Laura, I had a feeling about you--the feeling that it's not good for you to be in this house--that perhaps you might be better off if you left, that you might be happier and safer away from Collinwood. Why? asks Vicki accusingly. I can't explain , says Laura, it's just a feeling I have. I see, says Vicki. David will be going away with me, says Laura, and you'll have to find yourself another job with another family anyway. That's true--if he goes away with you, says Vicki. He will, Laura says, and he doesn't need you as much as he did--of course I'm not suggesting you leave--I just know that it might be best for you--take it as a suggestion--and think it over, hm? All right, says Vicki, I'll think it over--but I'm not sure that I want... She looks up. Laura has disappeared.
She calls to her twice, staring around, breathing hard. Where did she go?

NOTES: Sounds like Laura made a thinly veiled threat against Vicki, who had better watch her step! Laura doesn't want her at Collinwood before, especially now that she's a conduit to Josette, who is clearly Laura's enemy in her urgent plot to get David--but for what purpose? This scene gave me the chills. Laura is so quietly, but so obviously EVIL!

I agree with Carolyn that Roger is definitely afraid of all this, and he wants Guthrie to leave because the doctor represents dealing with the unknown, which Roger can't handle. Add that to Carolyn being put in charge of the business and house, Roger feels usurped and probably exposed and fearful. He also wants to get rid of David, and senses that what's going on might jeopardize that hope. I do enjoy Edmonds and Barrett together; they crackle deliciously when they're disagreeing.

Guthrie is cool. He's a nice guy, but he's also eager to get to the bottom of the problem at Collinwood--and probably hopes he, too, will see a real ghost. He's also cautious--notice he didn't come right out and say Laura is the opposing force, he wants better evidence first. Will he get it? Will another seance tell the tale? Will they be able to keep Laura away from this one, if it does happen, and allow Josette to name names?

Love, Robin

Offline Lydia

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Re: #0170/0171: Robservations 09/19/01: Laura, Saboteur, Dream-Weaver
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2012, 07:37:30 PM »
Vicki continues to speak French (which I can't understand after taking it 5 years).
Here's what I have, though it's by no means perfect.

FRENCH:

Guthrie: Speak to us!

Vicky: (moans, and then) Il...Il...Il y a danger ici.

Roger: She’s speaking French!

Carolyn: Vicky doesn’t know French!

Guthrie: It must - must be Josette!

Vicky: Il y a des pierres [du mevière?] de tombeaux vides.  Il y a une morte qui n’est pas de mortes.  Elle marche dans le monde.

Carolyn: What does it mean?

Guthrie: Sh!

Vicky: Il y a une qui dorme sans sommeil, sans reveille.  Il y a un petit garçon innocent qui est en danger sérieuse.  Il y avait des...des feux...des feux pendant les siècles.  Il y aura un autre feu prochainement.  Les flammes toucheront le ciel.  Les flammes consumaient (?) tous.  Il y a une présence en diable.  Il y a quelqu’une qui va détruir.  Cette personne...s’appelle...cette personne...s’appelle...cette personne...(screams)


ENGLISH:

Guthrie: Speak to us!

Vicky: (moans and then) There...There...There is danger here.

Roger: She’s speaking French!

Carolyn: Vicky doesn’t know French!

Guthrie: It must - must be Josette!

Vicky: There are stones [something I can’t decipher] of empty tombs.  There is a dead woman who is not of the dead.  She walks in the world.

Carolyn: What does it mean?

Guthrie: Sh!

Vicky: There is one  (feminine) who sleeps without sleep, without waking.  There is an innocent little boy who is in serious danger.  There were...fires...fires through the centuries.  There will be another fire soon.  The flames will touch the sky.  The flames will consume(?) all.  There is a diabolical presence.  There is someone (feminine) who will destroy.  That person...is named...that person...is named...that person...(screams)

Offline Lydia

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Re: #0170/0171: Robservations 09/19/01: Laura, Saboteur, Dream-Weaver
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2012, 12:04:26 PM »
Il y a une qui dorme sans sommeil, sans reveille.
Oops, watching episode 171 and listening to Guthrie's summary, I realize I got this wrong.  It's rêver, not reveille, so it's without dreaming, rather than without waking.  And "dorme" for "sleeps" still doesn't work for me - shouldn't it be "dort"?  It could be the subjunctive, but that would suggest uncertainty on the part of Josette, which seems unlikely.  So that could be wrong, but doesn't seem to be, judging from Guthrie's summary.