Author Topic: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood  (Read 4511 times)

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Offline ROBINV

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Episode #1 - Here we are. . .the very first episode of DARK SHADOWS, originally shown June 27, 1966:

We see a train speeding into the darkness, hear its whistle, then the first voice-over, spoken by Alexandra Moltke: "My name is Victoria Winters. My journey is beginning--a journey that I hope will open the doors of life to me and link my past with my future." She looks at her reflection in the window, and we see many other passengers in the car with her. A quarter moon hangs high in the sky. "A journey that will bring me to a strange, dark place"
(we see the black spires of Collinwood) "to the edge of the sea high atop Widows' Hill--a house called Collinwood" (we see Elizabeth Collins Stoddard, staring out the drawing room window, which she opens) "a world I've never known, with people I've never met--people who tonight are still only shadows in my mind, but who will soon fill the days and nights of my tomorrows."

Roger Collins pours a drink and, staring into the fire, downs a swallow. He sees Liz staring out the window. "A watched pot never boils," he reminds her, "to coin a phrase." She sourly asks if he doesn't think he ought to look in on his son. He tells her the little monster is asleep, and he's delighted. At her angry look, he says, I choose my words with infinite precision. You're a fool, she says. Not one tenth the fool you are, he accuses--look at you, standing at the window looking out into the night, looking for someone who never should have been asked to come here in the first place! She'll work out very well, I'm sure, says Liz. Doing what? he demands--holding my little son's hand?--comforting you when the shutters creak?--Elizabeth, with all our ghosts, we don't need any strangers in this house, and you know it. I think I can be the judge of that, she says. But you don't even know the girl, he protests--I'm your brother, and I'm thinking only of your own welfare--why bring somebody all the way up from New York to do something we are perfectly capable of handling ourselves? Because I choose to do so, she retorts. Come to your senses, he says, annoyed, when the girl arrives, give her a month's salary and tell her to go back where she came from
--why don't you open the doors and let the whole town come trooping through the house and be done with it? The girl will stay, insists Liz, marching away from the window. You are a fool, he says, yes, you are, inviting problems... The only problem I've invited is standing before me at this moment, she says coldly--I have asked Miss Winters to live here and she'll stay. He silently raises his glass in a mock toast to her. She opens the double doors and goes out into the foyer. Roger watches her, then covers his mouth with one hand and breaks his glass in his clenched fist in the other.

Train - (It's fun to see outdoor scenes of the train speeding along) - The conductor enters the car and takes Burke Devlin's ticket. He tells Burke they'll be in Collinsport in 10 minutes. Burke ignores him, but you can tell he's thinking hard. The woman sitting beside Victoria Winters warns her that it's the winters that will get her up here in Maine--they're cold and damp. The conductor tells Vicki they will be in Collinsport in 10 minutes, and she thanks him. Better have your baggage ready, he warns, only two of you getting off here, it won't be a long stop. It doesn't sound like much of a place, does it? Vicki remarks to the lady. There hasn't been a stop there in five years, the other woman tells her--that's what kind of a place it is
--why are you going there, anyway? Vicki tells her it's a job. What kind of job would bring a girl like you all the way from New York? The woman asks in a gossipy tone--let me tell you something--I've been living in this part of the country all my life and I've only been in Collinsport once--just once--and that was more than enough for me! Vicki has slipped a letter out of her purse and begun to read it.

We flash back to Vicki sitting in an office with an older woman, who is reading this very letter: "Elizabeth Collins Stoddard, Collinsport, Maine"--I'm sorry, Victoria, that name doesn't mean anything to me--when did you get this letter? This morning, Vicki replies, I don't know why she should offer me the position, I've never heard of the woman. Obviously she's heard of you, says the other woman. But how? asks Vicki. I wouldn't know, says Mrs. Hoeppel. Are you sure? asks Vicki. Oh, Vicki, I've already told you, the other woman says. I've looked at a map, says Vicki--Collinsport is only 50 miles from Bangor.
I see, says the other woman--surely you don't think there's any connection? I don't know what to think, says Vicki, rising from the chair, all I do know is I've spent most of my life here in the foundling home, living, working now, and suddenly I get a letter from a woman I've never seen, living in a place I've never heard of--wouldn't you say that's a little bit strange? What I would say is, she replies, is that you have an offer of a job as a companion and governess--at a very fair rate of pay--the only question you have to answer is, do you want to take the position? Mrs. Hoeppel hands her back the letter. Vicki takes it and gazes down at it.

Train - Vicki's seat mate comments that she might not like a small town after living in New York City--what is she going to do? Vicki, staring at the passing countryside, turns to look at the woman, who chides her for not having heard a word she said. Vicki apologizes--she was daydreaming. I was asking you, says the other woman, what are you going to do for fun? Next stop, Collinsport, calls the conductor, moving through the car. Oh my goodness! exclaims Vicki, rising to get her suitcase from the overhead rack. The woman offers her help, but Vicki assures her she doesn't need any, and the two women bid each other goodbye--oh, Miss, good luck, she tells Vicki! Burke Devlin stands, too, puts on his coat and takes down his suitcase and briefcase. Vicki goes down the staircase, bag in hand, and stands on the platform under a sign that says "Collinsport."

Vicki watches forlornly as the train leaves the station, stranding her God knows where. Burke Devlin is standing on the platform, too, and she walks over to him and asks if he knows if they have any taxis here. I wouldn't know what they have here--not anymore, he says.
How can they expect anybody to get to town? she asks him. Broomsticks and unicorns (LOL!), he says--and chauffeured cars--one pulls up--can I give you a lift? he offers--I can take you to the hotel--you'll get a taxi there. That's very kind of you, she says, Mr...? Devlin, he says, Burke Devlin. She introduces herself and he welcome her to the beginning and the end of the world. She smiles and says she's afraid she's not going that far--only to a house called Collinwood--do you know it? He gets a weird expression on his face and says he does--very well--shall they go? They walk to his car, and both get into the back seat.

The car pulls up in front of the Collinsport Inn, and the chauffeur helps Burke and Vicki out of the car.

Burke looks around the lobby of the inn and remarks that it hasn't changed a bit--does she still want a taxi? How else can I get to Collinwood? she asks. You can take my advice, he says, take the next bus to Bangor--get a train there for New York and be home by morning. Thanks, she says, but I'll settle for the taxi. He rings the bell on the desk. The desk clerk (Conrad Bain) comes out of the restaurant and says he was just getting a cup of coffee. My name's Devlin, says Burke. What? asks the clerk, then his face lights up--Why Burke, he explodes enthusiastically, it's nice to see you! "Burke Devlin!" Burke repeats angrily, ignoring the other man's welcoming gesture--I wired for three rooms. Yes sir, says the clerk, oh yes, we're expecting you
--your rooms are ready, I think I have a message for you. And I want a taxi for this girl, orders Burke. The clerk says he's sorry, he doesn't think that will be possible for a while--Harry--you know Harry, he reminds Burke. I don't know anyone, says Devlin nastily. Harry Jones, says the clerk, he runs our taxi, he's got a flat and is getting it fixed (only one in Collinsport?) How long will that take? asks Burke. The clerk starts to speak, but Vicki, sensing the tension, assures both of them she doesn't mind waiting--she's sure it won't take too long. Thank you, Miss, says the clerk, relieved. Vicki tells Burke she's come this far, she can wait another few minutes. If you want to, says Burke. The clerk hands him a message. The clerk directs Vicki to the coffee shop--he'll let her know when her taxi's here. Vicki thanks him for his kindness. Burke, crumpling up the message, asks when it was left here. The clerk says about an hour ago. Burke hands him some bills and tells him the red suitcase is Vicki's; the black ones go upstairs--and he leaves the Inn. The clerk looks at the money. What a strange man, says Vicki--you know him, don't you? The clerk nods and says yeah, since he was this high--and he indicates a child's height.

Blue Whale - A hatted man paces the bar, beer in hand. Other patrons sit at the bar, enjoying drinks. The man sits down at a table. Burke enters and sits down with him. You were supposed to meet me at the hotel, Strake, says Burke. Hello, Mr. Devlin, says the other man--have a seat--bring another beer for my friend, he directs the bartender. Burke sits down with him, saying he's not interested... Come on, says Strake, smoking a cigarette, you pay me for my work and I do it--don't begrudge a man the chance to buy his employer a drink. Let's find out what I'm paying you for, says Burke. Fair enough, says Stake, taking a paper out of his coat pocket--I should charge you double the way these people clam up--where do you want me to start? Burke is silent when Bob Rooney, the bartender, comes to the table. He's a nice fella, says Strake, smiling at Burke's discomfiture--he thinks I'm a real estate salesman, that's a laugh, isn't it?--he says this joint really starts jumping in about half an hour when the kids get here. Suppose you get started, says Burke impatiently--I want to know everything you have on the Collins family--everyone who lives in that house on the hill--and anyone who has anything to do with them. Then can I go back home to New York? asks Strake. Start talking, orders Burke.

Inn - The clerk enters the restaurant and looks in on Vicki, who is being served a rare roast beef sandwich and coffee by none other than KLS, who is wearing a short blonde wig. I'm starved, says Vicki. You are also a jerk, says Maggie Evans. Vicki stares at her, shocked--I beg your pardon. Jerk, repeats Maggie, then spells it out--J-E-R-K. Well, thanks, says Vicki. Don't mention it, says Maggie--the name is Maggie Evans, and right now I'm the last link in a long string of gossip--the sandwich rare enough for you? It's fine, says Vicki, bemused, but I still don't understand. It's like this, says Maggie--the chauffeur tells the desk clerk, who tells a housekeeper, who tells me--that you're going to work up at Collinwood--that makes you a jerk. But why? asks Vicki. Listen, honey, relates Maggie--the Collins family is the biggest thing in this town--they own the biggest cannery, the biggest fishing fleet, the biggest, darkest, gloomiest old house--and they're kooks--every one of 'em! I don't believe that, says Vicki. OK, move in there, says Maggie--but take a good look in that mirror right now--because in two months that pretty hair of yours is going to be one glorious shade of gray!
Vicki grins and shakes her head--you make it sound like some old English novel with rattling chains, ghosts in the corridors... You think that's wrong? asks Maggie--I could tell you things about that house that would rock you from here all the way back to the railroad station. I'd rather not hear them, says Vicki. OK, says Maggie--there's one born every minute--but you're going to need your strength--apple pie on the house, and I won't take no for an answer. Vicki says she'll say yes, and sits there, thinking pensively, checking her dark hair in the mirror. We flash back:

Vicki remembering her friend at the foundling home asking her, "What are you trying to do, bury yourself?" Just the opposite, says Vicki. With your looks and brains, you could get a dozen jobs you want, right here in New York, says the other girl, sitting on Vicki's bed--hey, that's my slip you're packing! Vicki apologizes and hands it back to her--it's not the job, Sandy, it's the place. You've got a yen for fishing villages? asks Sandy--so go out to Long Island!--have a ball--but a no where place like Collinsport, Maine? I don't really want to go, says Vicki, but I have to. Sandy says that doesn't make any sense at all. But it's true, says Vicki, this could be the most important step I've ever taken in my whole life! Sandy rises from the bed and asks what? To me, finding me, says Vicki, staring at herself in the mirror
--seeing who I really am.

Did you say you were looking for something? asks Maggie, bringing Vicki back to the present, and this mirror behind the counter she's looking into. I was thinking, says Vicki. Say, you are in trouble, remarks Maggie--talking to yourself, and you haven't even been up on the hill yet--maybe you belong in that house. Maybe I do, agrees Vicki, and sips her coffee.

Blue Whale - The big problem was the old lady, Elizabeth Stoddard, says Strake, smoking--not much I could dig up about her. Does she still run the business? asks Burke. She makes all the important decisions, if that's what you mean, replies Strake--the manager of the fishing fleet goes up to the house to see her about once a week. Does she ever go into town? asks Burke. Nope, says Strake. So, he says, that hasn't changed. The best I can learn, Mr. Devlin, is that Elizabeth Collins Stoddard hasn't left that hill in 18 years. Did you find out why? asks Burke.
There are a number of stories gong around, says Strake, none of them make much sense--they'll all be in the report--personally, I think she needs a keeper. Burke smiles--perhaps she's getting one. Like who--you? asks Strake. No, a girl, says Burke, who doesn't know what she's getting into.

The thing I would do, Maggie advises Vicki, is stay here in the hotel overnight, go on up to the house in the morning, look around, then make up my mind. The clerk comes in. Well, says Vicki, I'm not sure. Maggie bending your ear? asks the clerk. Just giving her a little sound advice, says Maggie, that's all. Don't listen to her, says the clerk, she'll have you running for the hills before you have time to pack your bag--your taxi's here. Vicki thanks him. What are you going to do? asks Maggie. Exactly what I came up here to do--thanks for the pie, says Vicki. Consider it part of your last meal, advises Maggie--good luck. Vicki starts to leave. Tell me the truth, says Vicki--you were just trying to make me nervous, weren't you? Sure, says Maggie, after hesitating a moment--sure I was, honey--it'll be a ball. Vicki looks at her skeptically, then leaves. Maggie shakes her head.

The taxi drives up to the front door to Collinwood.

Vicki goes up to the door and knocks.
Elizabeth opens the door and invites her in. She closes the doors. Vicki sets down her suitcase and looks around the house. We see her through the window, standing in her new home, looking quite small amidst the grandeur of Collinwood.

NOTES: So here we are introduced to the main players in our early DARK SHADOWS story--pretty Vicki Winters, summoned to take a mysterious job by a mysterious woman and on a search for her own past; Elizabeth Stoddard, regal, stunning in her dark dress and expensive jewelry; Roger Collins, droll, cruel, not a Father of the Year candidate who disapproves of Victoria Winters before she even arrives; Burke Devlin, who seems to have an antipathy for both Collinsport and Collinwood, as well as a mission that involves Strake, PI; Maggie Evans, waitress and philosopher, who warns Vicki to turn around and go home, and already seems protective and concerned for her. We see a bit of Vicki's past at the foundling home, learn of how she came to take this strange job in this desolate town as governess to David, who is described by how own father as a monster. There are little hints into as to character, all fascinating, and in stark black and white, we meet them here and get to know a bit about them. This will unfold slowly, but with far more insight into character than we've ever seen before on this show. Tomorrow, we will meet a Carolyn who will shock you!

The language sounds somewhat dated, as everyone urges people to "have a ball." This show actually holds up beautifully, given that it's over 3 decades old, but some expressions are jarring.


Episode #2 - Victoria Winters' intro tells us that she's here now, and there's no turning back. Liz gazes at Vicki sternly. Vicki apologies for being so late--she had trouble getting a taxi. Liz asks if she has her letter. Yes, says Vicki, it's in my purse. May I see it, please? asks Liz (a lack of trust)? I've never been in such a big house, says Vicki, as Liz opens the letter--how many rooms do you have? 40, but not all in use, says Liz--it's quite cold--I put on some tea--would you like to wait in the drawing room? Vicki thanks her. 40 rooms! She says, you must need a lot of people to help you take care of it. I have one man for the heavy work, we do the rest ourselves, says Liz coolly--and she heads into the kitchen area. Vicki enters the drawing room, where a fire burns, and looks around with great interest and curiosity. She stares out the window, her hand on the glass, then opens it and listens to the wind and the waves crashing below.

Liz returns with the tea tray and sees Vicki staring at the portrait over the mantel. Jeremiah Collins, my great grandfather, built Collinwood, says Liz--he was a very strong man--how often I've wished that...how do you like your tea, lemon or cream? Lemon would be fine, says Vicki, thank you--I think it's wonderful you can manage this house with only one person. The East Wing was closed over 50 years ago, says Liz, we only use part of the rest--one lump or two? One, says Vicki--are you expecting someone else? I asked my brother Roger to come down to meet you, says Liz---you're to care for his son and tutor him--she hands Vicki the tea. What kind of a boy is he? asks Vicki. You'll meet him in the morning, says Liz, after a moment's hesitation. I know, but I mean, says Vicki, is he friendly, is he inquisitive?--does he like to play games?
--oh, when I was nine, I know I... David is likely to be different from any boy you've ever met, says Liz, interrupting her--oh, Roger, we're in the drawing room, she calls--Roger, I said--but he's already left, to Liz' dismay. We don't have many visitors here, says Liz, but you'll have your day off and several nights a week. I hadn't even thought about that, says Vicki. And there's my daughter, Carolyn, says Liz, you're about the same age--I'm sure you'll get along very well, she's a lovely girl.

Blue Whale - Carolyn Stoddard, blonde, pretty, dances the frug at the Blue Whale to the cheers of a host of cheering male onlookers. Her boyfriend, Joe Haskell, sits and watches uncomfortably as she struts her stuff. The bar is packed with dozen of extras. The guys clap enthusiastically, drink beer and encourage Carolyn, who appears to be really enjoying herself--and is probably pretty drunk.
Burke and Strake sit at the bar, and the latter tells him he told him this joint starts jumping when the kids get here--they sure were right. Burke asks if he's positive that's Carolyn Stoddard. Real fire-eater, huh? Asks Strake. Carolyn dances her little tush off. All in the report, says Strake--all in the report. Carolyn laughs as she dances, shaking it, not breakin' it.

An cute guy plays another rockin' tune, looking hopefully in Carolyn's direction. Carolyn is sitting at a table with Joe, but he dances over to their table and asks her to dance again. Why not? she says. Joe objects, taking her arm, and she says something to Joe about not having to do something just because he's done it (the music drowned out exactly what she said). Joe says he thinks she's had enough, and her dancing companion advises Joe to go back to his beer, eh sailor boy? Joe tells the dancing Carolyn she's making an idiot out of herself, and Joe and the other guy get into it, grabbing each other by their jackets, about to trade fisticuffs. It's between me and my date, warns Joe, you let go. Carolyn intervenes, asking Joe to cut it out--let her have one dance with him. Joe and the other guy release each other, but he warns Joe he's ready for him anytime. Carolyn tells him he doesn't want to tick anybody off, and begs Joe to let her have the dance. Joe is unhappy, but he sits down, drinking his beer as Burke and Strake watch. Better luck next time, sonny, quips Strake. Who is that boy? asks Burke. Full rundown on page 20, says Strake--Joe Haskell--Mama's choice for little Carolyn--oh, I wish my wife could wiggle like that! Joe watches Carolyn dancing with another guy, who is leaping all over, and soon another guy takes the first ones, place. Carolyn hesitates for a few moments, then keeps on dancing with the replacement. Joe intervenes, taking he hand, suggesting they leave, but she insists she wants one more dance. I think we ought to go now, says Joe, but this pisses off Carolyn's dancing partner, who tells Joe that the floor is for dances only--get lost! Joe punches the guy in the belly and his friend comes after Joe, and a fight ensues.
The bartender picks up the phone and dials the sheriff, and Burke stands to see the action better. At Strake's suggest that he break it up, Burke jumps into the fray, separating Joe and the others. He gives one of them a dirty look and the guy foes and sits down. Burke tells Carolyn to go home--now. She asks who he is, and he tells her he's a friend of the family--and advises her to go home before the cops get here--take her home, Haskell. Carolyn looks pissed and, hands on hips, demands to know what gives him the right to... Burke interrupts her and tells her to go home with him--before he takes her over his knee and paddles her right in the middle of the dance floor--now go on! He retreats back to the bar and Joe hands Carolyn her purse and coat. As they are leaving (and Carolyn is furious), Burke tells Joe to come back after he brings Carolyn back where she belongs--he wants to talk to him. Joe doesn't reply, but he does leave. Strake sips his beer and tells Burke the fight's over. Just beginning, says Burke, just beginning. And the crowded bar is filled with dancers.

Liz leads Vicki to her room. It has a large canopied bed. Liz closes the window, warning Vicki that the catch doesn't hold well; she'll have to be careful--she hopes she'll be comfortable. Vicki tells her it's very nice. I slept on that bed every night until. . .begins Liz, then stops and says until she was married. All we had in the orphanage were cots, plain iron cots, says Vicki. I'm sure you'll have ample drawer space, says Liz, opening the drawers in the dresser. Vicki asks Liz why she offered her the position--she's never seen her before. Does it matter? asks Liz. I'd like to know, says Vicki. Simple enough, says Liz--my brother knew someone in the foundling home where you worked--he asked for a recommendation. But I asked--they said they'd never heard of you, says Vicki. You must have asked the wrong person, says Liz smoothly. A door slams, and Liz excuses herself. (She's wearing a long, gorgeous gown, looks like fancy evening wear.)

Left alone, Vicki closes the door and sits down on her bed. She looks sad.

Carolyn returns home, mad. She crosses her arms over her breasts and calls the guy in the portrait over the mantel "Big Shot"--who told him to build this prison anyway, she asks forlornly.
Liz comes in, all set to rail at Roger, but she's surprised to see Carolyn home so early. Neither did I, says Carolyn. What happened, darling, is something wrong? asks Liz Nothing, says Carolyn. Liz puts comforting hands on he daughter's shoulders. Carolyn wonders why it's impossible for her to enjoy herself? Liz offers to make some tea, but Carolyn doesn't want any cake or tea--she just wants to go to bed. Are you sure nothing's wrong? asks Liz. Oh, Mother, I'm so tired, wails Carolyn, of trying. Liz holds her.

Liz and Carolyn sit by the fire together, Carolyn on the floor, Liz on the hearth seat. That sounds horrible, says Liz, I can't understand Joe Haskell. It wasn't his fault, says Carolyn. You don't know how I worry about you, says Liz. I know, says Carolyn, but let's face it, you love this house--and that's just grand for you--but every chance I find to walk away from here and find a little brightness--how can you ask me to give it up? There are other ways, points out Liz. Carolyn grins and says when she was 10 years old, she'd dream a white knight would come along and rescue her from this dungeon--I guess white knights have gone out of style. I thought you liked Joe Haskell, says Liz--all I ever pray for is for you to be happy--Joe loves you. And I like him, says Carolyn, but he's not a white knight, Mother. We can't always get everything we want, says Liz. I'm going to try, says Carolyn--please, stop trying to marry me off--OK?--besides, how do you expect me to go away and leave you alone in this beautiful nut house? She gestures to all that's around them. I won't be, says Liz, not anymore. You mean she actually came? asks Carolyn excitedly. A few minutes ago, says Liz--she's a nice girl, you'll like her very much. Carolyn shakes her head and says all she can say for her is that she must be out of her mind.

Vicki descends the stairs, still in her coat, and listens at the drawing room doors. She gazes at the portrait above the table in the foyer. Boo! She tells it. She goes outside (yes, outside) and we hear the roar of the ocean.
She walks down some steps, finally stopping at Widows' Hill, where she gazes down at the sea. Roger Collins approaches from behind. "Not planning to jump, are you?? he asks, smiling
--"You wouldn't be the first, you know. She identifies him as Roger Collins, and he admits it--he's brother of Elizabeth, father of David and terribly sorry if I startled you. She tells him she's getting used to surprises. We're quite a strange crew, he says, but I think you'll find most of us rather nice--it's quite different from New York, isn't it?--they both look out over the ocean--I hope you won't be too lonely here. If I am, she says, I'll blame it on you--Mrs. Stoddard said you're the one who arranged for me to come here. Roger looks at her. You don't say, he says. It's true, isn't it? she asks. If Elizabeth says so, he smirks, then it must be true--do you know that on a cloudless day, you can see 20 miles out to sea? Vicki looks where he's pointing. As a boy I used to bring a picnic lunch out here and dream for hours. Maybe I can do the same with your son, suggests Vicki. With David? asks Roger doubtfully. Doesn't he like picnics? asks Vicki. I'm not exactly certain what he does like, says Roger, but if you intend to follow that plan, stay away from the edge. Vicki chuckles--really, Mr. Collins, she says. He tells her he much prefers Roger--and advises her to go in--he doesn't want the brightest thing in this house catching cold the first day. I'm stronger than I look, she assures him. She points out to sea and asks what those lights are. Probably a freighter on its way to Europe, he suggests. Funny, they go all those thousands of miles, and I couldn't get here from the railroad station, she says. I should have come down to meet you in the car, says Roger--I was very thoughtless. I was lucky, she says, a man got off the train with me and got a taxi for me--he said he knew you--Devlin. Roger suddenly grabs her in a painful grip. What did you say? he demands. Mr. Collins, please! she cries. Did you says Devlin? he asks--Burke Devlin? Yes, she says. Are you sure? he asks, shaking her, very upset. Of course I'm sure, she says, what is it? He runs off, Vicki calling after him. We see the water coursing over the rocks below.

Collinwood - Vicki comes in through the kitchen into the foyer. She hears someone playing the piano in the drawing room, a lugubrious tune, and goes in. Liz is playing. Vicki stands listening for a few moments. Liz bows her head over the piano, crying,
and Vicki discreetly leaves and goes upstairs.

NOTES: What makes Liz cry? Why did Roger run away at the sound of Burke Devlin's name? Why is Carolyn so eager to get drunk and make a spectacle out of herself when she has a boyfriend of whom her mother approves? Or is that why she behaves like a bad little girl? She says she likes Joe, but doesn't love him, yet according to Strake's report, he's Liz' first choice for "little Carolyn."

Carolyn likes to be the center of attention, especially from males. There was something about her attitude that made you think she wasn't just dancing with these guys, but coming on to all of them. It's apparent the young guys in Collinsport enjoy watching her strut her stuff.

As for Burke Devlin, he is investigating the family--why? What are his plans for that info? He broke up the fight and sent Carolyn home, even threatening to spank her for misbehaving. She's probably at least 18, so did he have the right to do that? Whether he did or not, he took it. And why does he want to see Joe?

So, what do you think so far of the first DS episodes?

Love, Robin

Offline VictoriaWintersCollins

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2010, 05:35:22 PM »
Well by all accounts, Devlin appears to be a bit of  a pompous jerk.

Judging by his rudeness towards e hotel clerk.

Who kinda hates the Collins family.

Carolyn is somewhat flighty and bored with her life and Joe Haskell.

Hungry for any type of excitement.

Collingsport and Collingswood appears to be harboring  some MAJOR secrets.

Victoria Winters, truly a babe in the woods.
My name is Victoria Winters, my journey is just beginning.

A journey that I hope will open the doors of life to me and link my  past with my future.  A journey that will bring me to a strange and dark place.  To the edge of the sea, high atop Widow's Hill, to a place called Collingwood.

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2010, 06:12:09 PM »
I think it's necessary to try to approach the start of DS as something "new", in other words, without the baggage from our having seen DS in later storylines.   The characters and situations are different.   I mean, I instinctively take the side of the Collins family, but you're not expected to early on, and in fact, Burke has some reason for his complaints.

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"One can never go wrong with weapons and drinks as fashion accessories."-- the eminent and clearly quotable Dark Shadows fan and board mod known as Mysterious Benefactor

Offline VictoriaWintersCollins

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2010, 07:00:13 PM »
My faint recollections of DS mostly involve Barnabas, so this is indeed new to me.

I am curious to learn what grudge Burke has against Roger and his family.
My name is Victoria Winters, my journey is just beginning.

A journey that I hope will open the doors of life to me and link my  past with my future.  A journey that will bring me to a strange and dark place.  To the edge of the sea, high atop Widow's Hill, to a place called Collingwood.

Offline Nightfall59

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2010, 07:37:01 PM »
I just finished watching the beginning episodes for the first time in ages and I was surprised how well it kept my attention. A different DS from the Barnabas years, but still enjoyable.

Some of the language is dated, though I can remember saying "have a ball" etc. as a kid. lol.

What strikes me as most dated is Liz thinking the only way Carolyn can leave Collinwood is through marriage. Hmm.  Isn't she a heiress? Couldn't she get her own place somewhere? Go to college perhaps? Or...gasp!...get a job? She is only eighteen.

Maggie is a sassy bit of sass in these very early episodes. So different from later on, when she became the perpetual victim and Vicki Lite.

I had to laugh at Liz in her black velvet evening dress and dangly earrings saying she did her own housework. Sure. OK.

"Not without you. NEVER without you."
Barnabas to Julia, 1970

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 09:12:10 PM »
I'm seeing all this for the first time myself.   I'll never look at Roger the same way again!   You're right about Carolyn, Nf.   The biggest mystery was why there was never any mention of the possibility of college for her.   I think my oldest sister went off to college that year, we weren't rich, and Carolyn was smart.    She acts as if she's too good for Collinsport, and never leaves!

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Offline B.Collins

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Re: #0001/0002: Robservations 05/17/01:Vicki Comes to Collinwood
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2010, 08:32:18 AM »
i think anyone who loves the show as much as we do here, should always try & approach the show as a newcomer when we start at Episode #1.  i know i do. yes Roger in the Early Days is well an ass. & it really isn't until he  finds out [spoiler]Laura is going to Harm David in some ways,[/spoiler] when it begins to effect him.  & i'm glad that they later on Made David More likeable as well. he was a kid that needed spanked when the show 1st started.

& as for Carolyn. i didn't really realize how immature she was until i started re-watching the show a few months back & read some of Robervations here. That Robin here very Kindly made for us to read. thank you Robin.

i am of course referring to when the started. & it's i think great that they had her grow up & realize the world isn't about her. i do agree though, she always called "Collinwood" a prison yet she never went to College nor did she do any work at all. at least not until [spoiler]Liz was put under a spell by Laura.[/spoiler] & at least "Roger" worked for a living.

i dunno about you guys & gals but if i was stuck at home as MUCH as they were, i'd be bored out of my mind! Roger at least works. Liz does too granted,  but in the early days she never really left the house unless it was to walk the grounds. & i dunno about you guys & gals but that would bore me to death. not going out like a normal person. i am thrilled that even though the show has it's faults of not explaining what happend to some of the characters when it ended in (1971) at least we found out about why Liz was wearing that Key around her Neck which i believe you can see in Episode #1. or was it #2? one or the other he he. ya know?