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Messages - Gothick

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6481
Current Talk '02 II / Re: He's back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
« on: July 10, 2002, 09:26:04 PM »
I just love Tom's scene with Nicholas in the basement.  There's such an "edge" between the two of them.  And Tom clearly thinks Nicholas is off his rocker!

Sarah, be sure to watch for Julia's reaction in tomorrow's show when Barnabas mentions the name "Tom Jennings."  She definitely looks "interested"!

Note to Amanda:  there are some GREAT Prof. Stokes scenes coming up this week!  Thayer David really is head and shoulders above the other cast members in this week's episodes.  I find myself wondering again whether Thayer "revised" his own dialogue since it is so much wittier than the remainder of these rather banal scripts.

Gothick

6482
Current Talk '02 II / Re: Memory Lapse
« on: July 09, 2002, 12:26:34 AM »
Hi Lindsay,  

I can state as definitively as anything in this insane world of ours can be stated that the scene you described NEVER aired on Dark Shadows.

There was however a scene between Louis Edmonds and Lara Parker that started out somewhat the way you describe this one ...

S
P
O
I
L
E
R

In 1840, Edmonds played the aged Daniel Collins. When Angelique arrives, calling herself Valerie Collins, Daniel remembers her as Angelique who was eventually found out to be the witch who caused all the trouble back in 1795.  However, the way the scene is played in 1840, it is Angelique who traps Daniel in the drawing room ...

In general, DS seems to have avoided direct references to religion.  Apart from crosses, and a character occasionally exclaiming some variant of "Dear God!"  The one exception to this rule is with the various incarnations of Trask, and the Trask family in 1897.  The depiction of religious hypocrisy in the Trask family caused some fundamentalist organizations to print pamphlets and leaflets condemning DS as "the Devil's playmate" or something along those lines, which I personally think is a HOOT, but that's another matter.

It was interesting (to continue this discussion just a little further) that when Barnabas and Angelique are fighting Laura Collins in 1897, they both use invocations and holy names from Ancient Egyptian religion, rather as Isis was called upon by the forces of good in the classic 1932 film The Mummy (please don't confuse it with the remake).

Hope you continue to enjoy Dark Shadows.

Gothick

6483
Current Talk '02 II / Re: who is that?
« on: July 08, 2002, 10:03:48 PM »
I never realized before who that chap was!  Thanks for the informative post.

As for the upcoming episode, a certain Miss should know better than to eat in the living room, if she wants to stay on good terms with Daddy!

I do have to say that so far as I recall, Shannon looked VERY toothsome in that uniform.   So to speak ...

Gothick

6484
Current Talk '02 II / Re: First Post/And a bit about me
« on: July 08, 2002, 09:57:26 PM »
Dom dear,

Thrilled to see you here!  I was just looking at a photo of you earlier this a.m., and commenting upon how fresh and sassy you looked in it!  but don't worry doll, I won't hate you for being beautiful, "lol"!

This board has some really amusing topics, and some great folks, too.  Hope to see you around more.

Hugs, Tuffie

6485
John, This is a FABULOUS idea!  Of course, there would be ceaseless amorous intrigue amongst the male cast members you mention ... chasing ONE ANOTHER though, instead of the usual dippy ingenues!  Each of the Hoffman sisters would take turns offering romantic advice to the men.  One episode could revolve around the ruckus that ensues when Conrad Fowkes' character "borrows" one of Roger Collins' favorite ascots for a hot date with biker boy Brian S.  The brouhaha over "that ascot" would make the fracas over "that pen" seem like a veritable tempest in a teapot.

I do think the series would need a name change.  Perhaps Sequined Shadows?  Shimmery images of Carol, Grayson and Lovelady in beaded frocks hovering over the waves could be part of the title sequence.

Good luck with your job search, John!

Steve

6486
Current Talk '02 II / Hunk alert!
« on: July 05, 2002, 10:27:31 PM »
Does anybody else feel a distinct stirring of excitement of a PERSONAL nature (that's the Ernestine Tomlin version of saying something's up that's not for airing on a "family" board) at the sight of gorgeous Don Briscoe on today's fab new collage?

I presume that Don's debut as luscious "handy man" Tom Jennings will be broadcast next week on the Sci Fi Channel.  I may have to watch his first episode on tape this weekend.  The suspense is just TOO annihilating!

For those of you who are new, after Don left the show the first time, people picketed the studios demanding his return!  Fortunately for us, this was one occasion when TPTB paid attention to fan input!

I've always wanted to see which photo(s) of Mr. Briscoe were chosen by "16" Magazine for their rare late Sixties publication, the Adonis Book.  Do any of the fans out there in Cyberia have a copy so we can find out for sure?  

A Don fan 4ever,

Gothick

6487
For those curious, here is a longish snippet from a version I wrote a couple of years back of my chapter on Polly Magoo.  This comes after I've explained that Grayson played a character in the movie named Miss Maxwell, who was based upon Diana Vreeland who edited Vogue magazine in the Sixties.

If anybody copies this to their site, could you please indicate that it is an excerpt from Grayson: a woman's face, the forthcoming book length study of Grayson Hall's life and art by S. R. Shutt?

Thanks, Steve

Originally, Klein wanted New York actress Ruth Gordon for the part of Miss Maxwell.  But Gordon did not know French-contrary to current widespread European practice, Klein wanted the actress to be able to loop her own dialogue-and, moreover, was unwilling to put her career on hold for a couple of months to make a trip to Paris.  Klein had met Grayson at a party a few years previously, and gotten to know her in the course of various visits to New York; she seemed like the next logical choice when Ruth Gordon proved unavailable.  As he recalled recently, Grayson was "a little bit hungry, and crazy enough to do it."  He expressed considerable satisfaction with Grayson's performance, recalling her as "a very good actress."  

The film certainly gave her the most dramatic entrance of her entire cinematic career.  In  the midst of the chaotic preparations for a fashion show held inside a huge, Cubistic, beehive-shaped structure, she marches in, lips pursed in disapproval, eyes wide and scrutinizing, a packet of Marlboros, a cigarette lighter and a pair of sunglasses clutched tightly in one hand.  Her dress in this initial sequence showed elegant restraint, and included a chic white cape, provocatively draped over one shoulder.   As the first model enters wearing a strange confection of angles and curves carried out in shiny, glittery aluminum, all eyes are on Grayson, eagerly and anxiously awaiting her verdict, which bursts like a cry of basso exaltation from her almost feverish lips:  "Magnifique!"  A triumphant Handelian chorale (the baroque score was the work of Michel Legrand) carries forward the cry of "Magnifique, magnifique, magnifique!" as the camera swirls around a poised procession of models, each in a more unlikely and immobilising suit of haute-couture "armour" than the previous one.  The final model appears enveloped in a long steel tube that leaves her unable to move, with a sort of bulb at the top for her breasts and arms.  As she is literally elevated (on a lift) over the mob of fashionistas and photographers, with angles that suggest Mary's Apotheosis,  Miss Maxwell leaps to her feet and declaims the line:  "He has re-created Woman!"   The scene is not only devastatingly beautiful; it's a brilliant slash at the strange ways in which fashion literally paralyzes women in its cruel but glamorous grip.

Although reviews and summaries of the film describe this sequence as including a scene in which Miss Maxwell acclaims Polly Maggoo as incarnating the new Look, in the final version of the film such a scene does not exist.  Instead, Klein cuts away to Polly walking the streets and dealing with the attentions she receives from her obsessed fans.  Grayson's second appearance in the film comes about about a third of the way through the running time.  This time she enters in the midst of the rackety but sybaritic melee of the Vogue offices-ladies receiving pedicures, makeovers, noodling away at arcane layouts, or simply gossiping whilst lolling about on cushioned divans.  Again, Grayson's entrance is flamboyant: she swaggers into the room attired in an extraordinary costume that might best be described as "seraglio chic."  A huge turban tied with a black moire bow and a pair of vast earrings composed of intricately worked filigree beads frame her face, heavily painted a la Theda Bara, with glitter eyeshadow shimmering exclamation points above her naughtily gleaming eyes.  A vest and blouse in sheer silk provide the backdrop for festoons of gems and a medallion that could have been used by Julia Hoffman a year later as a lethal weapon.  Huge pantaloons with gathered pleats emphasize her imperial role as undisputed sultan of this haute-couture satrapy, and little harem slippers provide yet another of those notes of jarring whimsy that were one of Diana Vreeland's signature points.  Her rings spark further fashion explosions, especially the outsized knuckle-duster spyglass ring with the thick black frame that seems to gleam with a frenetic lustre.  The scene has barely begun when  Miss Maxwell grabs the telephone and begins dictating her latest  proclamation, full of bold headlines such as: "Fashion is dead!  Long live fashion!"  She repeats her battle cry:  "The great producer of the female body, Isidore Ducasse, has recreated Woman!" and, with a sly wink, describes his aluminum chic collection as suitable for "The Eve of the Atomic Era!"  

6488
Current Talk '02 I / Re: Hammiest Ham that ever Hammed
« on: June 26, 2002, 07:23:09 PM »
It's interesting to read these reactions to people watching these shows for the first time now. (I assume that you're all discussing the episode where Julia discovers Barnabas' body, and tries and fails to drive a stake through his heart to prevent him from rising as a vampire.)  When I first saw this show back in the Summer of 1968, I was still pretty much a new viewer, and I remember that the show had me struggling to hold back tears of sadness (bear in mind that I was 9 going on 10 at that point).  

I obviously did not know the previous history Barnabas had with Julia and Willie, and how odd it was for Willie to be reactiing the way he was to the situation.  

Watching it as an adult, it seems like a very odd episode indeed.  It seems as if Grayson and Johnny had barely had the chance to rehearse their scenes in the early part.  You get the feeling that it was one of those "off" days in the studio.  Strangely, though, the awkwardness and jerkiness of the two characters' behavior makes a weird kind of sense, given their emotional state as written in the script.  At least, that's how I see it.

The script is beyond bizarre in places, though.  How goofy is it to think that burying someone would keep him from rising as a vampire?  Someone as knowledgeable about that particular as "affliction" as Julia Hoffman was, would know just how ridiculous that idea was.

Gothick

6489
Current Talk '02 I / Re: SLAP tomorrow!
« on: June 24, 2002, 05:21:23 PM »
Oh, one of my all time favorite episodes!  For me it is in the DS top ten.

I just LOVE Julia's expression as she walks away apres slap.  The look of satisfaction on her face speaks VOLUMES!  Vicki's line is a good one too.  And don't take your eyes off dear Cassandra as Vicki exits!

Some great shows coming up this week.

Gothick

6490
Current Talk '02 I / Re: Another side of Angelique
« on: June 21, 2002, 07:58:17 PM »
Just a note to Thom ... nice to see you posting here ...

And to RP:  darling, you should see MY candle budget. Does the term "looney tunes" mean anything to you???

Gothick

6491
Current Talk '02 I / Re: Malpractice
« on: June 21, 2002, 07:49:57 PM »
But RP, my dear, where do we START with Dr. Julia Hoffman's malpractice suit???  Her drug dispensal history alone makes the novel Valley of the Dolls look like an episode of Romper Room.  Then there's her use of hypnosis to promote patient memory suppression, her shameless false diagnosis in the cases of Maggie Evans and Sabrina Stuart (and don't you have to suspect that those two were just the tip of the iceberg???), AND the infamous Dave Woodard hypo!

Still, the more shamelessly she behaves, the more I luv her!

A day without Julia is like a day without sunshine!

Happy Solstice back atcha, RP!

Steve

6492
Testing. 1, 2, 3... / Re: Password
« on: June 21, 2002, 05:25:10 PM »
Wow, Evil Butterfly Dress, I hope you make it!  You're one of the chosen few to really "get" just why Cassandra's nightmare butterfly peignoir RULES.

I have a tale in mind about that dress, btw ... perhaps this Summer I'll finally write it.  It is something that needs to be written during the Summer ... Cassandra feels like a creature of Summer to me.  Capricious, glamorous, dazzling ... and ruthlessly cruel.

Gothick

6493
Current Talk '02 I / Re: I hate it when Grayson goes on vacation
« on: June 20, 2002, 09:37:30 PM »
Julia darling,

At some point in the Summer of 1968, Grayson took time off to appear in one of our favorite films--End of the Road.  It was not released until the winter of 1969-70 because the director was a film editor and he spent a year cutting and re-cutting it (and it still got an X rating).  As you know, 2 of Grayson's scenes wound up on the cutting room floor.  I'd personally rather see those scenes than the material that was cut from house of Dark Shadows, but both are probably gone with the wind in any event.

End of the Road was filmed in Great Barrington, MA.  I'm not sure exactly where the beach scene was filmed.  LOVE that scene.

Happy Summer Solstice (tomorrow!),

Steve

6494
Current Talk '02 I / Re: What a cheap shot
« on: June 20, 2002, 06:37:38 PM »
Oh, I *love* that shot of Nicholas and Cassandra outside the house.  I majorly groove on the psychedelic color scheme of Cassandra's nightmare butterfly peignoir (of course, I LOVE IT that she rematerialized still wearing that thing--can't you just hear all the demons snickering away down in the Inferno when she turned up in that outfit), especially as imprinted upon the weird electric blue color scheme of the house.  It's really trippy!

My nomination for the worst special effect on DS has to be the use of a still of Dennis Patrick having some sort of bizarre fit which was inserted at a key moment because the actor was not available for the episode.  That was one script that needed a rewrite because the work-around they came up with was simply ludicrous, even by DS standards.

Robin's right, though, that a lot of us kids who watched the show believed EVERYTHING we saw way back in the day.  It didn't take much to impress us back then.  My sister had nightmares for weeks because of the scene involving the spell Nicky puts on Cassandra's hand, mentioned in a post above.  

Thanks to Raineypark for the fascinating post about conditions inside a typical TV production studio of the 1970s.  Great stuff!

Steve

6495
Current Talk '02 I / Re: Luciaphil....I'm calling on the spirits...
« on: June 20, 2002, 06:27:02 PM »
Luciaphil darling, Count me among those who miss your posts, as well.  I knew you were on vay-kay and figured you'd get back to a mess of work, so did not want to intrude upon your few moments of leisure.  But now that others have made it known how missed you've been, I'll take up the Jebez Hawkes Call for Zombie Mayhem:  "We must have more!  MORE!  M-O-O-O-O-R!!"

My nomination for the most shivery E. F. Benson ghost story of all time is The Room in the Tower.  I've often wondered whether THIS story was the origin of the notion of the Dream Curse.  The DS version never got anything like as creepy as what Benson produced on the printed page. Even now, thinking of it makes me shudder.

I've been having cravings for some of the M. R. James ghost stories, myself.  "Ghost stories of an antiquary"--a masterpiece!

xo,  Gothick

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