Dark Shadows: Reincarnation Mark B. Perry Reveals the

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Messages - Gothick

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6076
Well, given that the writer (I use the term loosely, you understand) of this tiny gem of expository prose implied that DS only "spawned" ONE feature film, And that Joan only did "a few TV films" between 1971 and her passing, it's hardly to be expected that s/he would be aware of Grayson's post-DS career (which was more noted for stage work than films or TV).

Steve

6077
Current Talk '03 I / Re:"Eye of the Devil" and Dark Shadows
« on: June 19, 2003, 06:16:38 PM »
Vlad, I think the David Hemmings character was supposed to be gay, but it was so understated in the finished film as to be practically unnoticeable.  It was also implied, I thought, that the Sharon Tate character had a queer side, and isn't there dialogue that identifies her as a witch?  basically anybody who was in tune with the outdoors, animals, herbs, etc. was often described as a witch in village society.

G.

6078
I ***LOVED*** Ode to Angelique back in the day.  I saw in 16 magazine that a 45 of it was out and looked EVERYWHERE for it, but of course could not find it.

We did not have a cassette recorder then, so I never got to make a tape of it, but they played it so frequently on the show that I soon memorized the tune.

It was a huge thrill for me when all the different arrangements came out on the one DS CD.  I found the original 45 a somewhat disappointing arrangement when I finally got to hear it.

Joanna's theme is beautiful, in my opinion--one of my favorite Bob Cobert tunes.

I really wish there had been a moment where Hoffman turned to Bruno, arched an eyebrow, gave him a smile so frosty it left icicles on his schnozz, and purred "Composer?  Come off it, babe, you were never more than an uppity Las Vegas lounge act!"

another missed opportunity,

G.

6079
Hi Vlad, if you can find it, there is a very useful book called Sexual Heretics, edited by Brian Reade and published in 1970, that reprinted a lot of these 1890s poets who challenged the literary orthodoxy of the day with their daring queer subject-matter (and often explored obscure fixed forms in a fascinatingly creative way--Ezra Pound, of course, had complete contempt for any poet who worked in fixed forms).

I wonder whether the portrayal of Gray in the Wilde film may have been based upon the account of Gray in a very gossipy book by Rupert Croft-Cooke, Feasting with Panthers.  Croft-Cooke also wrote a book about Wilde's sex life that was loaded with salacious anecdotes about folks like John Gray and his very twisted lover, Andre Raffalovich.

As for Bosie Douglas, I don't think he was ever taken very seriously as a poet, though he desperately wished to be.  Some of his poems do stand up surprisingly well, but at the time, with his title and his privileged background, everyone in London simply regarded him as a spoiled dilletante riding on O. W.'s coat-tails.

Sadly, Bosie grew more embittered and vitriolic as time went on, and he made life for Wilde's executor, the saintly Robbie Ross, as difficult as possible.

Excuse all this natter, maybe something here of interest,

G.

6080
Current Talk '03 I / Re:"Eye of the Devil" and Dark Shadows
« on: June 18, 2003, 03:58:33 PM »
Oooh, Witches and Homosexuals!  *my* kind of people...

G.

6081
Cape May?  I've always wanted to go there.  Among other things, I'd love to scrounge through the local library (or maybe it would have to be the newspaper morgue) to look for clippings from Grayson's appearance there in a summer stock play.  May have been a production of the Man who came to dinner.

Totally off topic, but a friend to whom I loaned my new Daughters of Darkness DVD (which I have yet to view, since I don't actually own a DVD player--oops!), confessed his "embarrassment" at lusting after Johnny the K.  I informed him that back in 1970, Johnny had the sexiest tush on screen!

And Connie has the screen captures to prove it.

G.

6082
Hey Jennifer, can I get hunk intern Chris Jennings to give me a total body exam? wait, don't let me trip over my own trousers as I fumble to remove them!!!

suddenly, I'm just loving the American medical system!

xoxo G.

6083
I believe that Turn of the Screw was originally produced for UK television, in which the convention is that all "outdoor broadcast" (OB) material is shot on film, while indoor/studio material is shot on video.  The look is familiar to fans of Dr. Who and other British television hits of the 70s and 80s.

Gothick

6084
That was a good review.  I personally find the Curtis Dorian Gray top-knotch, well acted television drama.  Some profess to find the adaptation boring or kitsch, but I like Davenport and Briant the best of any of those who have essayed the key roles of Lord Henry and Dorian.  I think the production would have worked even better had Basil been more the way he was in the book.  The adaptation made him too hetero (and cast him with an actor who was about 10 years too old for the part) and more taken with Dorian's innocence than his startling physical perfection. In the book, in which Basil was a throwback to the male-focused artistic ideals of ancient Athens.

I don't agree with Robert Osbourne though that the publication of Dorian Gray started Wilde's legal troubles.  The book came out first in magazine form in 1889 or 1890.  And I think the cloth publication was in 1890 or 1891.  Wilde's legal difficulties resulted from his relationship with Lord Alfred "Bosie" Douglas.  Although readers of a later time often assume that Dorian is a projection of Wilde's troubled paramour, in reality Dorian was inspired by John Gray, a conflicted aesthetic poet who flirted with Wilde for a time in the late 1880s.  I don't believe Wilde and Douglas met until around 1892.

Bosie Douglas' papa, the notorious "Scarlett Marquis," the Marquis of Queensberry (an enthusiast of pugilism), was outraged by Wilde's antics with his son. Wilde actually wanted to be more discreet--Bosie manipulated his lover to push the envelope in order to get at his father, whom he hated.  All this is ably dramatized in the Stephen Frye vehicle, Wilde (in which Jude Law portrays Lord Alfred Douglas very much as the vitriolic monster depicted in Wilde's own prison memoir, De Profundis, and also Andre Gide's If it die not, which deserves to be more widely read).

For comparison, I recommend the 1970 Helmut Berger vehicle, Dorian Gray, with Herbert Lom as Lord Henry Wotton.  In this version, the story was updated to the milieu of the late Sixties and decadent, Swinging London, and the gay aspects were made somewhat more explicit, considerably more so than in the Dan Curtis version.

Gothick

6085
Darling, I'm laughing myself sick here!

fortunately for all concerned, instead of seeing this on Freaky Friday, I've been enjoying it on Manky Monday.

Now isn't THAT special.

kiss kiss,

Gothththththth (ends in that weird squeak that Angelique sometimes emits when she takes a sharp intake of breath--yeah, it's a witchy thing)

6086
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Fashion Notes from the Runway observer
« on: June 16, 2003, 07:56:27 PM »
Hey Julia, I have to wonder whether Grayson demanded sleeves on the housekeeper's uniform dress.  It's very odd that it was short sleeved that one day.  I thought she looked better that way, as well.  She may have felt that her arms were too skinny.

I also liked the necklace.  It suited her.

xo  Steve

6087
Calendar Events / Announcements '03 I / Re:Scream of the Wolf
« on: June 13, 2003, 03:58:29 PM »
Thanks, Arashi.  I finally checked IMDB yesterday, and the flick with Babs Rush in it was MOON of the Wolf.

Now that's something I'd LOVE to see on Chris Jennings, hmmmm...

(just realizing what a train wreck the whole Sabrina episode was for poor darling Chris, after cackling wildly over the MB's HILARIOUS farewell montage to the two of them--you know, it's like the NY Times:  you can tell how the Editor feels about someone from the photos they choose to display for their send-off!)

G.

6088
Current Talk '03 I / Sci Fi's trashy DS broadcasts
« on: June 13, 2003, 03:49:22 PM »
OK, am I going out of my mind, or has the quality of Sci Fi's DS feed gone waaaayyyy below par???

I had the show on both yesterday and today.  Yesterday's viewing was very brief, but it looked, in the scene between Carolyn Loomis and Daniel in Angelique's room, as if someone had smeared brylcreem all over the camera lens (hmmm... maybe Buzz was visiting the studio that day?)  I don't remember this problem on my tape of that episode.

And on today's show, I noticed instantly that the feed looked grainy and washed out, compared to my MPI tape.  This was during today's second show, which is one of my favorite episodes in all DS, and I've viewed my own tape of it many times.   I found myself wondering whether the source material for the broadcasts is low grade copies of the masters rather than a higher quality thingamujig?

I know NAHSSINGK (bellowed with Magda Rakosi elan) about technical details of today's television broadcasts, but I notice that TV Land always maintains a high quality image when they run old shows, and I don't understand why Sci Fi can't do the same for DS.  I guess it may be the only Sixties show they are running now, so perhaps they just don't care anymore.  (Come to think of it, on TV Land's Bewitched marathon, one of the Dick Sargent era--ca. 1970 shows ran as a blurry, grainy film copy, where clearly no one had bothered to strike a new print of the episode for whatever reason.)

btw, when they were running that TACKY Stargate promo DURING the start of Act One, and acidic schmutz was belching all over Carolyn and Barnabas, I really felt the programmers were adding insult to injury!

Makes me profoundly grateful I don't rely upon Sci Fi for my DS viewing...

G.

6089
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Farewell Montages
« on: June 13, 2003, 03:36:55 PM »
Great Montages, darling Maestro misterioso!  Superb work as always.

I'll have to try and figure out which show that WEIRD shot of Liz with the black tape on her nose is from.  I recall that being discussed some years back, I think in one of Luciaphil's episode commentaries.

I'm not sure I've ever seen that episode, but it must be among my tapes, since I have all the shows from June 1967 onwards.

G.

6090
Current Talk '03 I / Re:"Eye of the Devil" and Dark Shadows
« on: June 12, 2003, 07:28:48 PM »
Vlad!  I saw this topic a few days back, but stupidly thought you were talking about the Lara Parker flick, Race for the Devil.  I wish I had realized you were talking about Eye of the Devil; I'd have had a friend tape it for me.  I used to have a tape of it (from an AMC showing of many years ago, back when they aired movies without commercial interruption) but loaned it to a friend who never returned it, and who is no longer in contact.

Interestingly I have an old magazine (from around 1965) that has a publicity article on the making of Eye of the Devil, or 13 as it was then known.  When I finally got to see it, I thought it was a real gem.  Niven, Kerr, and Flora Robson all shine in their respective roles.  I thought David Hemmings and Sharon Tate were both remarkable in what they were given to do.  I think Tate had real promise.  It's a shame she met Roman Polanski and moved to Hollywood. I have a bizarre fondness for Tate's performance in Valley of the Dolls.  Edith Efron (the evil beeyotch who wrote a nasty article about Grayson in TV guide) interviewed Tate for an infamous Look magazine spread on Dolls and implied that Tate was a brainless bimbo.

So far as I know, Eye of the Devil is not available on video or DVD.  It's a pity, because I think it is a beautifully crafted film.  It is really a mood piece that evokes the inner power that lives within the Earth, and how people in traditional communities hold that power and the sacrifices they make to honor that strength and to allow their communities to survive.  It was of course far too thoughtful and unusual a film to achieve any real critical recognition, then or now.

I'll bet David Niven and Deborah Kerr wish this had become better known than Casino Royale, a fun fluffy film they did together shortly after this.

Best wishes,

Steve

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