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Messages - Gothick

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4171
Current Talk '08 I / Re: Elizabeth Collins / 18 yrs at Collinwood
« on: April 09, 2008, 03:24:03 PM »
The episode where Vicki persuades Liz to go into town to try to help Carolyn is one of the best.  Joan Bennett was incredible.  What a great actress.  Moltke and Barrett were also fabulous in that one, of course.

G.

4172
Happy Birthday!

cheers!  Gothick

4173
Calendar Events / Announcements '08 I / Re: Happy Birthday MB!!!
« on: April 09, 2008, 02:19:21 PM »
Mysterioso Darling, It's YOUR Special Day!

Here's wishing you health, happiness, and much joy!

Standing and Cheering,

Gothique

4174
Good luck and best wishes.

G.

4175
I'm not an Aries, but I *am* a huge Emma Peel/Avengers fan.  I'm also a huge fan of Honor Blackman and have been revisiting some of Linda Thorson's shows recently and finding them better than I had remembered (both in terms of Thorson's performance and as shows).  I also recently discovered Julie Stevens who appeared as Venus Smith in a few episodes during the 1962-63 season.

A friend told me that there are discussion boards where you can write reviews and share chat with fellow fans on A & E's "Original Avengers" site.  If I have the chance to check it out, I'll post the link in this thread.

I think that although the Avengers had a much more substantial budget and much glossier production facility than DS, both series share a number of attributes in common, including the ability to deploy distinguished veteran character actors in juicy guest roles and a look, sound, and style that become iconic.  Each in its own way, both also were definiing exemplars of facets of the mid to late Sixties cultural ethos.  I'm very pleased to see that both shows continue to find new fans!

G.

4176
Current Talk '08 I / Big Lou and Mighty Mitch, vintage '66
« on: April 04, 2008, 08:07:30 PM »
Fans,

Yesterday, I revisited the DVD Talk review of DS The Beginning collection III to help out a friend who's hoping to rent some Laura Collins episodes soon on his new Netflix account.  (From what I can determine, the third set ends before the introduction of Laura Collins in December of '66.)  Despite the hyperbolic language, I enjoyed the writer's description of our own beloved Big Lou, Louis Edmonds, and Mitchell Ryan in these classic shows.  A couple of corrections:  Louis WASN'T closeted (read the excellent biography of him, Big Lou, by the late, much lamented Craig Hamrick, to get more details about how blisteringly honest Mr. Edmonds was about his sexuality and every other aspect of his life), and however fey Roger's wardrobe may have occasionally seemed to the eye of a 2008 viewer, he was NEVER in drag.  (I sometimes think that Roger's PT 1970 counterpart occasionally sported invisible drag--but that's another story for another time).

The passage:

[...]episodes 71 to 105 truly belong to two people. The first is Big Lou - Louis Edmonds. A closeted homosexual in the days when being gay meant possible physical harm (not to mention industry blackballing), his Roger Collins is nothing more than a drag version of a spoiled rotten dandy. With a voice so clipped he could cut glass, and a mannerism so foppish he practically channels Oscar Wilde, Edmonds owns this storyline - and with good reason. Roger is the center of all the intrigue. He's the supposedly guilty party Burke is trying to blame. He's the source of young son David's ongoing homicidal streak. He uses Victoria as an alibi and then turns around and threatens her. And he pitches one mean hissy. Indeed, Edmonds makes many of these early installments, saving us from otherwise drab line readings and strained New York stage acting. The other creative catalyst is Mitchell Ryan. As the conniving and scheming Devlin, he does everything except chew the scenery - and that's only because Big Lou leaves very little backdrop behind when he finishes with a performance. Ryan is the manlier yin to Edmonds yang, and together they create an engaging cat and mouse.  (end)

The other thing that I would add is that as far as I'm concerned, all the members of the regular cast did stellar work in this part of the story.  I would particularly mention Joan Bennett who has some of her best scenes, and Alexandra Moltke who gets to play a much more knowing, thoughtful Vicki than we get to see later on.

Have a nice weekend, fans!

cheers, G.

4177
I really wish the episodes of Virginia Graham's Girl Talk show with Grayson Hall and Joan Bennett from 1970 would surface somehow, someday...

G.

4178
Many happy returns to Humbert Allen Astredo!  One of the true greats.

G.

4179
I saw a few minutes of a couple of episodes of Passions during the first year or so that it was on, just out of curiosity.  In one of the episodes. Timmy was naughty and the Juliet Mills character stuck him in the washing machine to "cool off."  A bubble opened up as a "Timmy doll" spun around and around in the machine advising viewers not to "try this at home."

If the show reminded me of anything from the Sixties, it was the Witchiepoo segments of H. R. Pufnstuf.  And then some vaguely pornographic hunk in a uniform would wander into camera range and read some really stilted dialogue off a cue card.  I'm really surprised it lasted as long as it did; the show did not seem to be directed at all and apart from Mills, none of the performers seemed to have had any acting experience or training of any description.  But, as I said, I'm making those observations based  on a couple of brief sequences I watched before switching off the series because the proceedings were too preposterous even for my looneytunes taste.

G.

4180
Current Talk '08 I / Re: Count Petofi
« on: April 03, 2008, 09:21:21 PM »
Mysterioso darling, Grayson Hall (Praise be upon Her Name!) mentioned in a fan interview tape recorded in March 1973 (btw, this is the same item that has circulated for years on the fan bootleg market as an interview taped in '74) that the ratings started to go down during the "Quentin/Petofi mind-switch thing."  I think she actually uses those words to describe it.  I can't recall whether she mentions that they received letters complaining about it or simply that the monthly figures were down during that time--probably both.

All sorts of arguments keep being mentioned about DS and the ratings and I have come to take all talk of such matters with more than just a scattering of salts.  I seem to recall years ago someone trotting out figures that showed that during the early 1967 Laura Collins storyline, the show actually had very respectable viewing figures, which calls into question the notion of the introduction of Barnabas saving a foundering show that had barely registered on anyone's radar theretofore.

Let the Count Petofi lovefest continue!  I just love the episode where Beth blurts out to the evilly gloating Count "you're mad!" and without missing a beat, he ripostes, "Perhaps so, but at the very least I am most far-sighted in my madness!"  Gotta love Petofi.

G.

4181
Current Talk '08 I / Re: Count Petofi
« on: April 03, 2008, 03:25:55 PM »
What a great topic!  It's interesting to see favorable discussion here of Count Petofi's return on the show.  The perception among the writers and the crew was that the Petofi storyline in 1897 dragged on way too long for the patience of viewers--this was blamed for a perceived initial drop in ratings.  The Petofi/Quentin body switch storyline which lasted a month and featured some really way-out plot twists (and one of my personal all-time favorite moments on DS--that shot of the DS skeleton tarted up in Wanda Paisley's tea-gown, wig, and big feathery aigrette--not to mention the whole return-of-Judith storyline, which I LOVE) was blamed in particularly for turning into a major turn-off for much of the viewership.  From what I can determine, it seems to me that they received a lot of hate-mail from the fans complaining about this, and the root of the complaints may have really been Jonathan Frid's one month vacation from the show, not the Petofi story and character in particular.

Anyhow, I definitely agree that a return of Count Petofi during the never-produced 1971 storyline would have been most welcome.

G.

4182
It was nice to see this yesterday.  Thanks so much for sharing it.

I'm really sorry that we never got to see Prentice in a different role and setting on the show.  I don't think Morgan was the best showcase for what he had to offer (apart from those trousers, of course--lol!).

cheers, G.

4183
Current Talk '08 I / Re: the dinner party
« on: March 25, 2008, 03:09:26 PM »
I think it's worth remembering just how much time the special effects took up in the seven or eight hours they had between arrival at the studio and taping at 3:15 ... MANY of the actors have commented upon how setting up the FX (primitive though they look to today's viewers) resulted in considerably less rehearsal time.  Actors did their best to make up for this by going over scenes on their own, but obviously this didn't always work out given the exigencies of blocking, the cameras, etc. all of which of course came into play with chromakey FX.

I got a couple more of the MPI DVD sets in the recent amazon sale (sets 3 and 4, specifically) and in one of them there's an interview with Nancy Barrett and at one point she just laughs and says "well, for one thing, you have to understand that it was all INCREDIBLY under-rehearsed!"  I'd rarely heard that point argued so bluntly but I think this has a lot to do with that air of barely controlled insanity we associate with certain episodes of the show.

I love it how in the various sequences in 1968 where Angelique and Nicholas pay calls upon Diabolos, the entire set fills up with mist from all the dry ice and smoke machines... I think this happened with a couple of the Maggie-wandering-around-Eagle-Hill scenes in '67, too.  That studio really was a tiny little thing.

G.

4184
Just to follow up ... I did order the Best of Checkmate season one collection, with Anthony George (co-starring with Sebastian Cabot and a youthful Doug McClure).  I watched several of these last weekend and they're great fun.

I checked the cast list for the episodes on the season 2 set and noticed another future DS alumnus, Dennis Patrick, on one of the shows they'll be releasing this week.

Best, G.

4185
Current Talk '08 I / Re: the dinner party
« on: March 24, 2008, 03:16:54 PM »
I remember those episodes well.  I particularly enjoyed the shows where Maggie had Joe over at the cottage and was more or less courting him, impressing him with her knowledge of nautical argot.  I believe the reviewer of the DS: The Beginning set 3 on DVD talk complained that he found these scenes boring, but I thought they were among the highlights of that period because both Crothers and Scott were so good at what they were doing with these scenes.  In the later years, we never got to see them act this kind of scene.

G.

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