Author Topic: #0013/0014: Robservations 05/25/01: David Acts Weirder Than Usual  (Read 1595 times)

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Offline ROBINV

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Episode #13 - Roger enters the drawing room and nervously faces Burke, who greets him warmly, holding out his hands in what seems to be real friendship. Roger ignores Devlin and asks Liz now long Burke's been there. Only a little while; she thought it wise to talk things over. Heartily, Burke says they have a lot of catching up to do--10 years' worth. Roger eyes him warily: "Why have you come here, Burke?" Roger asks. Burke says Roger and Liz both asked the same questions and suggests Liz explain. "He's only visiting," Liz explains--no other reason. Roger doesn't believe it. He's no fool. Liz begs Roger to listen to Burke. He agrees he will, and pours himself a drink, his face tight.

Smiling slightly, Roger says, "I'm waiting." Why so grim? Burke asks. "You think I'm responsible for your going to prison," Roger retorts. "That was 10 years ago," Burke demurs. "I want to try to forget about that." Or is it, Roger pointedly asks, if he would like him to THINK he had forgotten that?
Burke asks Liz what she thinks. She just wants them to talk it all out, that's all. They were once good friends, Burke says--he wants to erase the past--he came home to see the town where he spent 20 years of his life--and to show off how successful he has become. "Now you've made it," Roger says. Burke insists he is "comfortable."--"Ten years ago, a man was killed," Burke said, "and I went to prison." "Because you were guilty," Roger reminds him, and Burke's face loses its guarded expression for a moment. He smiles like it hurts, and anger flares in his eyes. "That was the jury's decision," Burke says. Liz reminds him that there was evidence against him. Yes, there was, he said--Roger's testimony-- "I went to prison and with good behavior was released after 6 years." He has worked, traveled, seen the world, made some money, and what happened 10 years ago didn't seem important anymore. So, Roger says, you came back to say hello, visit, leave. Yes, Burke says. Why, then, Roger asks, has he been asking questions about the Collins--Joe Haskell, Vicki? He asks about Burke and Vicki meeting on the train and in the hotel restaurant--why? Because Victoria is charming, Burke says, and he didn't want to have coffee alone. That's his only motive. Roger paces and Burke watches. There is nothing more to it, he promises, staring at both Liz and Roger, who stare uncertainly back, wondering if Devlin's sincerity is real.

Vicki walks to Matthew Morgan's cottage and knocks at the huge door.
When no one answers, she lets herself in and calls to him. (There is a kitchenette we never saw when it was Chris Jenning's cottage.) Matthew burst in and demands to know what she's doing there. She tries to explain, but he insists this is HIS house! He doesn't like prowlers. Vicki apologizes. She needs to talk to him. He must fix his supper, insists Morgan. She begs him for a few moments; it won't take long. He worries he might be called to the big house; he must fix his supper. She offers to help, but he refuses; he doesn't need her help or anyone else's. She can sit down and talk to him--but be quick about it!

Matthew eats dinner. Vicki asks him about Bangor, and she says she wants to know if anyone in the Collins family has any connection with anyone there. He stops her questions immediately, demanding to know if Liz knows she has come to see him. She says yes, evasively, but we can tell Vicki is lying. Matthew explains there is a Bangor-Collins connection--the Devlin trial. Burke was tried for manslaughter and sent away--and a good thing, too. She asks more questions. Matthew warns her about making trouble. The trial is old business--forget about it, he advises. He offers her some tea (gruff guy but mannerly). He doesn't know much about her, but he hates snoops. She only wants to learn about herself, she explains. When he presses her, she admits there is no connection between her past and the Devlin trials. Well, Matthew says roughly, stop asking questions about it, then! She takes him into her confidence and explains she was raised in an orphanage and knows nothing about herself. What's that got to do with Bangor, he asks, and she explains about the money that was sent to her since she was two--$50 When Mrs. Stoddard offered her the job, she made the connection, and hoped this would help her learn about herself. Adamantly, he warns her that if she has something against Mrs. Stoddard, she won't get a thing from him. She has nothing against anyone; she wants to know who she is and why that money was sent, Vicki says. Does he know anything? The only Bangor connection, he reiterates, is the Devlin trial.

Burke sincerely tells Roger, "Let bygones be bygones. Forget the trial, as I have." Roger complains it's cold and asks Liz to have Matthew bring in firewood. Roger, clearly wanting Liz out of the room, asks her to get some wood brought in or perhaps tea made. Left alone with Burke, Roger closes the door and solemnly says, "Now the truth, Burke--what brought you back here?" Burke insists he has already told him the truth. Roger counters that Burke seems to be forgetting he knows him very well--"you remember every hurt and every insult. People change in 10 year, but you haven't changed that much." "What do you want me to say--that I came up this hill to cut your heart out?" Burke queries. "That would be more honest," Roger says, "and would make me more honest with you. Let me tell you something, Burke--if you try to do anything, to me or my family, to any of us--the five years you spent in prison will seem like the best time you ever had." Burke bursts into laughter and congratulates Roger on having become a brave man. However, Burke says, he doesn't need the bravery. Burke asks about Roger's wife, and Roger's face grows dark as he responds, "That's not your affair." "Why? We were once very fond of each other," Burke reminds him. "Yes," Roger says ironically, "I know." Burke recalls that they were married the day after he was convicted, and Roger tersely nods. A kind of a victory celebration? Burke asks,
and Roger says, snapping, "All RIGHT, Burke!" Devlin holds up a placating hand: "OK, OK, you're absolutely right--it is past history and we ought to forget about it. One more drink, for old time's sake?" Roger agrees, not happy at all as he pours. Burke looks speculative, and smiles.

While he sips tea, Vicki samples one of Matthew's home-baked muffins and praised his eclectic talents--baking, taking care of the house, fixing machinery, chopping wood. Sternly, he reminds her he also makes sure nothing happens to Mrs. Stoddard. She asks him how she can get to Bangor from there. Bus or train, he says, and the timetable is in the station wagon's glove compartment. He offers her more tea and says she should go to Augusta, the state capitol, instead, where Roger and Mrs. Collins lived. They never lived at Collinwood, he explains. They got married right after the trial and moved to Augusta. Roger has only been back a short time--and Roger's return is the worst thing that ever happened to this house, Matthew states sourly.

Burke questions Roger about why he returned from Bangor. This is his home, Roger says. But Liz owns the house, doesn't she--and the business? Still his home, Roger says. Burke asks Roger if Liz might be interested in selling the house and/or the business. "Of course not," Roger says, "and you should know she wouldn't..." Burke interrupts, checking his watch, saying how late it is. He must get back to town and can't stay for tea. He is leaving town in a day or two, Burke says. It's great to see him again, really. Let's try to forget the past. That's up to Burke, Roger says. Burke says he wants to discuss a business matter and asks Roger to meet him at the Blue Whale in a couple of hours. Roger says he'll think about it, and Burke says to say goodbye to Liz. He will see Roger later.

Matthew, washing the dishes while Vicki dries them, describes an incident in which the car he was driving had bad brakes. Driving down the steep hill from Collinwood, they failed; he went right over the side and was nearly killed. To stay up there, you need strong nerves and good brakes, Matthew drawls in a terrific Maine accent.The phone rings. Matthew answers. They need firewood, Liz says. He tells her he is talking to Miss Winters. Matthew's face grows furious, and Vicki knows she has been caught in her lie.
He shouts at her to get out. Don't snoop around by him! Matthew orders, pointing the way out.

Vicki leaves the cottage and is getting into the car when she sees someone in the garage by Matthew's house. She finds Burke lounging around Roger's Mustang.
They do meet in odd places, he says. He was admiring Roger's car (and he has a tool in his hand, which he says he found on the front seat). He's thinking of buying one himself. She asks if Mr. Collins knows he is there, and he admits no. Vicki feels Roger would mind, if he knew, and he asks her to keep it their little secret. She tells Burke how upset Roger was about their having coffee together, and he says he knows that, Roger told him. He discusses Roger's choice of upholstery, and Vicki suggests that he leave. "Little Miss Winters," he says. He is overwhelmed by her loyalty to the family she barely knows. Don't worry, he and Roger patched up their quarrel. Yes, he comments, gazing at the Mustang, he thinks he will buy one.

Liz hands Roger the tea tray, and he says Burke left 15-20 minutes ago. He was full of apologies, Roger says. Liz asks what he thinks. Roger says he would like to believe Burke's attitude it real, but it was just too easy. Liz brings up Devlin's trip to South America. Roger doesn't believe he's really going, and Liz is skeptical, too. Roger reminds her Burke is an unforgiving man. He would be happy to see Burke go, but until Burke leaves, he will be very careful.
Burke and Roger should avoid seeing each other, Liz suggests. Roger explains that Burke mentioned wanting to see him about a business matter. Perhaps he does want to forget the past and be friends again, Roger muses, but he will never find out unless he accepts the invitation.

Vicki returns to Collinwood. Liz asks to speak to her. Vicki, intent on damage control, says if it's about Matthew, she really didn't think she'd mind her visiting him. Liz warns Vicki that Matthew is lonely, strange--and very loyal to her. Vicki knows. Liz says Matthew can be violent if he thinks anyone created problems for Liz. Vicki asks Liz if Roger is using his car tonight. Possibly, Liz responds, and asks why she wants to know. No reason, says Vicki, she was just wondering. Thoughtfully, Vicki trudges up the stairs.

NOTES: The initial scene with Liz, Roger and Burke is fascinating. We know Burke has had the Collins family investigated. He deliberately left the file on his phony South American deal in full view for Carolyn to read. Burke is trying to convince Roger and Liz that he means no harm and will not take revenge for being sent to prison 10 years ago. He sounds sincere. However, we are privy to what Roger and Liz are not--that Burke is showing far too much interest in a family with whom, he insists, he wants to "let bygones be bygones." There is evidently an ugly history behind this incident, something that evokes painful memories in both men. You can't blame Roger for his mistrust--and should we blame Burke for seeking revenge, which he obviously is? We don't know enough yet.

Matthew and Vicki's tentative relationship here is very fragile. He seems basically likable--but will brook no harm against Liz, whom he obviously adores, in his gruff way. He feels Roger's return was the worst thing that could have happened, but won't explain why. Yet he seems to like Vicki, too, (perhaps can even see a resemblance between Liz and Vicki??) However, when he catches her in her lie, he tosses her out as if he'd caught her holding a knife over Mrs. Stoddard. Liz later warns Vicki later about his intense loyalty, and Vicki will learn just how loyal Matthew is, to her detriment, later on.

The exchange about Roger's wife between Roger and Burke is very telling. What was the nature of the relationship between Laura and Burke, we wonder (judging by Burke's and Roger's reactions, deeper than it should have been). Why did Roger marry her the day after Burke's trial? Obviously, there are several significant layers here, mysteries about ancient relationships, that have yet to be revealed.

Burke brings up buying Collinwood and the Collins Cannery as though it were a regular business deal, but his eyes tell a different story. We sense he doesn't just want to buy these Collins-owned holdings; he wants to personally kick each family member out after initiating a hostile takeover. His motives are not casual, and his question fraught with significance that even Roger must feel.

Matthew tells Vicki that he was almost killed in a car accident on the estate, and says you need good brakes (and good nerves) as part of your survival pack at Collinwood. Shortly after Matthew tosses her out for lying to him, Vicki catches Burke in the garage with Roger's car (I do love these frequent outdoor scenes, which make you feel like Collinwood really is a huge, sprawling place) and with a tool in his hand. Did he tamper with Roger's car? Knowing how he feels and seeing the circumstantial evidence before our eyes, it sure seems like it, doesn't it? Hmmm, however...

And so, pieces of one of DARK SHADOWS' very first (and mostly non-supernatural) mysteries are presented in this pivotal episode.


Episode #14 - The dead past is still here in Collinwood, says Vicki. My past is here at Collinwood, and perhaps I will learn what it is--through the boy I tutor.

David lies in bed in his room reading a magazine called MECHANO. He tosses it away angrily and walks over to his dresser, gazing at his reflection in the mirror. He opens the top drawer and searches amongst his clothes, taking out what appears to be a part of something that looks like a large bullet.
He gazes at it, opens his door, and leaves his room, searching the hallway to make sure the coast is clear. He enters Vicki's room, looks around for a moment, then opens her dresser and looks through her stuff. Vicki enters and demands to know first what he's doing there, then what's in his hand. (She is still wearing the same god-awful dress as she has for days.) He hides it behind his back, refusing to show it to her. Things get physical as she tries to get it back from him, accusing him of taking something from her. He runs to his room and closes the door, leaning back against it with a look of helplessness and fear on his face.

Vicki diligently searches her drawers, trying to figure out what David might have stolen from her. She hurries out of her room and tries to open his door, but finds it locked. She orders him to open the door right now, but he's back on his bed, on his stomach, reading a magazine. I've had enough of this nonsense, says Vicki, knocking--if you don't open the door, now, I'll get your father to do it for me. He doesn't respond. All right, says Vicki, if that's what you want. This decides him--he unlocks the door, but leaves her standing in the hall. She enters. What did you take from my room, she demands--what did you take? Nothing, he says sullenly. I don't believe you, she says, you had something in your hand, what was it? Nothing, he says. Why are you like this with me? she asks. He doesn't reply, but lies back down on his bed with the magazine. She sits on the bed with him and tells him she doesn't care what he took--the important thing is you and me--David Collins and Victoria Winters--I want to be your friend--I know what it's like to be frightened--I grew up without a home, with no one to turn to when I was lonely. I'm not lonely, he says.
Well I am, she tells him--I need friends and was counting on you--when your aunt hired me, she wanted me to help you, and now I'm asking you to help me. How? he asks. Oh, I don't know--by smiling at me now and then--saying, "Vicki, let's go for a walk together"--by letting me comfort you when you're sad--and laughing with you when you're happy. You think my mother's never going to come back, he accuses her. Of course she will! Vicki assures him, and David, I know I can't take her place--I just want to be your friend, nothing more. I didn't take anything from your room, he says. All right, says Vicki. You don't believe me, do you? he asks. If that's what you say, then I'll believe you, she says. I'll prove it to you! he vows. You don't have to, she says. I'm giving you something--a present, he says. He goes to his dresser drawer to get it--I was going to surprise you when you started yelling at me. Why should you want to give me a present? asks Vicki. Because Aunt Elizabeth told me to be nice to you, that's why, he says--here--and he hands her a small shell--I found it near the water. Very pretty, she says--are you sure you want to give it to me? I said I was going to put it in your dresser drawer when you came into the room, he says--you said you wanted to be friends, didn't you? Yes, she says, smiling--thank you very much. Now can I read my magazine? he asks. Sure, she says. He returns to lying on the bed as Vicki leaves his room, shell in hand. She thanks him again. You're welcome, he says innocently. She closes the door, gazing at the shell, and David locks it behind her, a stoic look on his face. (He is lulling her into a false sense of security, and with a master's touch.)

Carolyn meets Vicki in the hallway and tells her she heard all that yelling and banging--figured it was her and the little monster--what was it all about? Vicki says she doesn't know. Carolyn notices the shell and asks where she got it. David gave it to me, says Vicki. Carolyn takes it and looks it over. A peace offering, I think, says Vicki. And you believe it, says Carolyn, handing back the shell. You believed Burke Devlin, didn't you? asks Vicki. That's different, laughs Carolyn--David's a kook--Burke Devlin's just a nice man who wants to be friends with the family. You hope, says Vicki. A clap of thunder makes Carolyn says, ruefully, looks like rain--there goes my hairdo. Vicki grins. I've got a date tonight, says Carolyn. You're not going out with Burke Devlin, are you? asks Vicki. Carolyn shakes her head and says she wishes she were.

Blue Whale - The joint is rockin' with dancers as Joe settles his tab with the bartender, apologizing for not doing it yesterday. Burke enters and asks Joe if he's keeping his credit good. Hello, Mr. Devlin, says Joe coolly, and Burke says that's a sour greeting if he's ever heard one--how about having a beer with me? Thanks, but I don't have the time, says Joe. You're not sore at me about last night, are you? asks Burke. Look, says Joe, with all that fuss yesterday, I forgot to pay my check--now I have and I'm on my way. One beer, how long will it take? asks Burke. I told you last night, says Joe, I'm not interested in your propositions--if you want to buy information about the people living in Collinwood, you'll have to go somewhere else. The bartender listens closely. I'm only offering to buy you a beer, says Burke Thanks but no thanks, says Joe, you might as well know this--I told the people up at Collinwood what you wanted. You did? asks Burke, bemused. Yes, says Joe--I don't know what you're after, but as long as it involves Carolyn or any member of her family, I want you to stay away from me. But I'm not after a thing, protests Burke. Tell it to them, says Joe.
I did, says Burke, just about an hour ago--I had a long chat with Roger and his sister, and your little friend, Carolyn--we're all pals again--no fights, no fuss, no worries--Burke gazes nonchalantly at the jukebox offerings as Joe gives him a look of disbelief, then leaves.

Carolyn, checking out how she looks in her dress, admires her reflection in the mirror in Vicki's bedroom. You look beautiful, praises Vicki--where are you and Joe going? I don't know, a movie, I suppose, says Carolyn--what else is there to do in this town? You can always have a fight in the bar, suggests Vicki sarcastically. Carolyn laughs and says one was enough--that's one place she'll stay away from for a while--of course, if I thought Burke Devlin might be around to break it up again, that might be different. She has a dreamy look on her face. You really like him, don't; you? asks Vicki. Let's say he's a little different than the people you're likely to meet in Collinsport, says Carolyn--you think this hem ought to be shortened? It looks fine to me, says Vicki--I wouldn't be too eager to join the Devlin admiration society, if I were you. Stop worrying, says Carolyn, Mr. Devlin is leaving town in a couple of days, so I'll just have to be satisfied with good old Joe. Who happens to be in love with you, Vicki reminds her. Uh huh, says Carolyn, like she doesn't care--I think if I took a half inch off, it would look better--what do you think? I think love is a good deal more important than charm, says Vicki, standing up to make her point. I don't know how we got into this, says Carolyn, but let's not make a big case of this--sure, I think Devlin is attractive, charming and dynamic, and he's been around--but that's the end of it--I brought him out here to make peace with Mother and Uncle Roger and it worked--chances are, none of us will ever see him again and it couldn't matter less--period--exclamation point! Vicki smiles and says her Uncle Roger is going to see him again, Good for Uncle Roger, says Carolyn, sounding deliberately unconcerned, but then she adds, "When?" What difference does that make? asks Vicki. No difference, lies Carolyn, no difference at all. Someone knocks. Carolyn asks Vicki to be a doll and let Joe in while she changes. Why, you look great in that dress, says Vicki. I think it's a little too schoolgirlish, says Carolyn, tell him I'll be right down, will you? And she hurries from the room, leaving Vicki concerned.

Thunder rolls as Vicki goes to answer the door and invites Joe in. Carolyn said she'd be right down, says Vicki, offering to take his coat. He thanks her; she places it on the table. Joe and Vicki introduce themselves to each other. I guess we know a lot about each other, he says, after they both start to say they've each heard about the other. She smiles and says she guesses so--Carolyn says she's known him for years and years. Ever since I was a kid, says Joe--I'll never forget the first time I came up here--I was pretty scared. Of what? she asks. Don't tell me this house hasn't scared you, says Joe--I used to think there would be a spook in every corner. Did you find one? asks Vicki. No, I stopped looking when I saw Carolyn, he says, I figured flesh and blood was good enough for me--what about you, Miss Winters--do you believe in ghosts? No, I don't think so, she says. I don't either, he says, only those you see in storybooks and movies--but if you don't believe in ghosts, what do you call that thing standing behind you. Vicki turns to look, falling into his trap, then laughs and tells Joe never to do that to her again. Sorry, I couldn't resists, he says, grinning--but if you're going to go on living here, you might as well make up your mind there are no spooks, except beautiful ones that keep their dates waiting. It hasn't been too long, has it? asks Carolyn, coming downstairs now wearing a dark, sexy sheath. When you look like that, remarks Joe, one minute is too long--hi--and he kisses her when she reaches the foot of the stairs. You two been getting acquainted? asks Carolyn as Joe helps her on with her coat. Mr. Haskell's been telling me about ghosts, says Vicki. Mr. Haskell? asks Carolyn--Joe, Vicki--and don't listen to him, he wouldn't believe in a ghost if it rattled his chains under his nose--we've got 'em--ghosts and demons--(Hellmouth!?)--and nine year old monsters--am I right? I think David and I are going to get along, predicts Vicki. Lots of luck, says Carolyn, tying a scarf on he head--shall we go? she says to Joe. We'd better if we're going to make that movie, says Joe. No movie tonight, insists Carolyn, as Vicki goes to retrieve Joe's coat, I'd rather go to the Blue Whale. Your mother would shoot me if I took you back there again, says Joe. Vicki looks perturbed. Then we won't tell her, right? asks Carolyn. I think you'd be better off going to a movie, Vicki advises Carolyn. You manage your monsters, says Carolyn, I'll manage mine. You're not being too smart, warns Vicki. Joe asks what the two of them are taking about. Just girl talk, nothing important, says Carolyn--now say good night to the nice lady and let's get going. See you again soon, says Joe. Sure, have fun, says Vicki. Don't wait up for us, suggests Carolyn. I still don't think the Blue Whale's such a great idea, says Joe. Let's try it anyway, says Carolyn, hmmm? Vicki watches them leave, worried, then goes upstairs.

Vicki stops at David's door. She hears the door at the end of the hall open, then close. Who is it? she asks, but upon investigating,
finds the door locked. Stop playing games with me, open the door, please, orders Vicki. I can't, David tells her from the opposite end of the hall, I don't have a key. But I...protests Vicki. You can't get in there, he tells her, it's always locked. But it was just opened, she says. It's never open, he says. But I...David, where does that door lead to? The rest of the house, he says--Aunt Elizabeth says it's been closed for more than 50 years. Does anyone ever go in there? she asks. I told you, he says, it's always locked. But it was just unlocked, I saw it open, she says. It's never open, says David, maybe it was one of the ghosts--the house if full of them, you know. Nonsense, says Vicki. It's not, he says, I've seen them--and if you stay here long enough, you'll see one, too--I have another present for you--do you like to read magazines? Sometimes, she says, as they enter her room--don't you know there's no such things as ghosts? They hate everyone here, don't you know that, he says. Now David, she says, wagging a finger at him, that's... He hands her a magazine, which he says is all about buildings and fixing things. She takes it from him and, thumbing through it says it's very sweet of him. Do you like my father? asks David Yes, I think he's a very nice man, replies Vicki. He hates you, says David. Why do you say that? she asks. I know, he says. That's not a very nice thing to say, she says. What was your father like? he asks. I told you, I don't know, says Vicki. You mean you never saw him? asks David. My father or my mother, she says. My mother's very pretty, he says. I'm sure she is, agrees Vicki. Do you know Burke Devlin? David asks her. It's awfully hard to keep up with you, says Vicki, you go from ghosts to... Did you ever meet him? asks David. Yes, says Vicki. He hates my father--did you know that? queries David. David why are you always talking about people hating other people? Because they do, says David--I bet I could be real good friends with Mr. Devlin. (Why, because Burke and David both hate Roger?)

Blue Whale - Burke watches a happy couple doing some '60s-type dancing, then sits down at a table. Joe and Carolyn come in and sit at a table. I still think we should have gone to that movie, says Joe. Don't be a party pooper, she says. Just one beer, that's all, says Joe. Some people don't know how to have a good time, she complains, and he reminds her what happened the last time they were here. Just don't punch anybody in the jaw and we'll be all right, she says. She spots Burke sitting at a corner table and grins at him. Seeing this smile directed somewhere else besides him, Joe turns to see what she's grinning at. Burke waves, and Carolyn waves back. That's all we needed, complains Joe. Isn't it funny him being here, remarks Carolyn. Nothing funny about it, says Joe, disgruntled. Maybe we should ask him to join us, she says eagerly. What's the matter with you? asks Joe, you know how Devlin and your family feel about each other. That's all fixed up now, she insists, I didn't get a chance to tell you. Joe says all he knows is he doesn't like the man. He protected you from being hurt, says Carolyn. Protected ME from being hurt? demands Joe. He broke up the fight, didn't he? asks Carolyn--funny thing is, we didn't even know who he was. I know now, says Joe, and I'd be a lot happier if I didn't have to see him again.
I think you'll have to, says Carolyn, smoothing her hair. Burke comes over to their table. Hi, kids, says Burke--out on the town? Hello, Mr. Devlin, Carolyn greets him, her eyes wide with delight. I didn't expect to see you back here tonight, says Burke to Joe. Neither did I, admits the latter. Now that we are all here, says Burke, how about I buy you a cup of coffee? Joe starts to refuse, but Carolyn tells Burke that's very nice of him--as a matter of fact, why doesn't he join them? I don't want to be a fifth wheel, says Burke. That's all right, says Carolyn, we just stopped in for a drink, didn't we, Joe? Joe looks at her, then says, yeah, sure with little enthusiasm. I'll buy, volunteers Burke, sitting down with them--it certainly is better than drinking alone. Carolyn immediately focuses goo-goo eyes on him. Burke grins at her and Joe looks uncomfortable. What will you have? Burke asks them, making an expansive gesture with his hands.

Upstairs hallway - Vicki advises David to look for the nice things in people, but he says most people aren't nice. You're only nine years old, how many people have you known? she asks. Enough, he replies. Poor David, she says--I think I'll give you a present. You don't have to, he says. But I want to, she tells him--when your father goes to town tonight, I'll give him some money so he can buy some of those magazines you like--I'll wrap them up on a ribbon and give them to you first thing in the morning. David surveys her seriously. You mean my father's going into town tonight? he asks eagerly. Uh huh, says Vicki. Is he going to take the car? asks David. He's not going to walk, says Vicki. I don't want any presents--thank you, says David--and he goes into his room.

NOTES: WHAT is David up to? Reading that magazine about mechanics--and the little item he had in his room that he apparently hid in Vicki's dresser--what evil is this troubled little boy up to? His peace offering was nothing more than a smokescreen, and God knows what he's doing--and trying to pin on Vicki. He needs a raft of shrinks to help figure out his problems. His talk of hate is scarier than all ghostly apparitions--but who or what opened that door at the end of the hall?

Carolyn has a severe crush on Burke Devlin, no doubt about it, and it's already causing trouble with Joe. Her open flirtation might mean the end of their relationship, but it's clear that she doesn't return Joe's feelings and doesn't want to marry him, anyway. Burke seems OK with fanning the flame of Carolyn's admiration, too, which is not at all nice of him, given that he's claimed to like Joe.

How do you like those dancing scenes at the bar? Bring back any memories? They do for me! Did you enjoy the banter between Carolyn and Vicki as the blonde got dressed for her date? What do you think of the clothes? Vicki's dress is showing up so much, I'm growing tired of it--and I'm sure she was, too.

Love, Robin

Offline VictoriaWintersCollins

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Re: #0013/0014: Robservations 05/25/01: David Acts Weirder Than Usual
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2010, 12:07:34 AM »
So Burke and Roger's wife have a romantic past?

The plot thicken.

Plenty of sudden interest in Roger's car, i smell a car crsh.

Young David is quite the little manipulator, has Vicki fooled so far.

Poor Joe, Blondie doesn't appreciate what a nice guy he is, who totally adores her.

She's too busy making googly eyes at Devlin.

SMH...
My name is Victoria Winters, my journey is just beginning.

A journey that I hope will open the doors of life to me and link my  past with my future.  A journey that will bring me to a strange and dark place.  To the edge of the sea, high atop Widow's Hill, to a place called Collingwood.

Offline MagnusTrask

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Re: #0013/0014: Robservations 05/25/01: David Acts Weirder Than Usual
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2010, 09:16:22 PM »
SMH, VWC?

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Offline VictoriaWintersCollins

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My name is Victoria Winters, my journey is just beginning.

A journey that I hope will open the doors of life to me and link my  past with my future.  A journey that will bring me to a strange and dark place.  To the edge of the sea, high atop Widow's Hill, to a place called Collingwood.

Offline MagnusTrask

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Re: #0013/0014: Robservations 05/25/01: David Acts Weirder Than Usual
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2010, 05:36:53 AM »
Ah.  Thank you.
"One can never go wrong with weapons and drinks as fashion accessories."-- the eminent and clearly quotable Dark Shadows fan and board mod known as Mysterious Benefactor