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Messages - Midnite

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8341
WE (Women's Entertainment) channel is airing a special tonite at 10 p.m. called "Night Bites: Women and their Vampires".  It has clips from Dracula, Interview with the Vampire, BtVS, Angel and will ask various experts the immortal question-- why do the undead always get the girl?

http://www.nypost.com/entertainment/76508.htm

But don't expect a mention of DS, cuz neither Frid nor Cross we included in the channel's polls that asked which vampire you'd most and least like to be bitten by:

http://www.we.tv

Werewolves and the Women Who Adore Them-- now there's an idea for a special.  :P

8342
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Admit it Barnabas.....you love her.
« on: May 28, 2003, 05:33:47 PM »
  by the by.. does anyone know what happened to Connie?  her wonderful story is also missing... thank you for any help..

I believe the story was posted on AOL, which she got rid of a while back.  Since she's no longer a registered cousin, you'll have to contact her off the forum to ask if it's available online, or IM LoveAtFirstBITE and ask her to pass it along.

8343
Luciaphil,

Got this info off the publisher's site after following the link from Craig's website for "a new edition of Big Lou":

Pages: 208
ISBN: 0-595-27281-9
Published: Mar-2003

The ISBN is identical to the one on the page you found, also the page linked to Stuart's site and in David's review.

8344
Welcome, David!

BTW, when ready to order the book, I heartily recommend using the link in Stuart's review because his website is a member of Amazon.com Associates.  The way the program works is that as long as you place your order during the same visit in which you came through the fan's website (this goes for Darren Gross' and MsCriseyde's sites as well, with apologies to anyone else I may have missed) the site owner gets a small referral fee for any purchase made at that time.

8345
Robservations / Re:Robservations 5/28/03 - #956 Return of Willie!
« on: May 26, 2003, 10:23:05 PM »
Robin, your numbering is still out of sequence.  I moved the eps up, so now you just need to tack #957 onto the end of this one.  That summary should contain scenes with Barn, Julia, Jeb, Maggie and Willie.  Thanks!

8346
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Today's Montage
« on: May 26, 2003, 08:08:40 PM »
He will be on episodes 956 & 957 which air on Wednesday. He then disappears again until episode 970.

Wednesday also happens to be his birthday. :D

8347
Recently published in San Francisco's Bay Area Reporter, a gay and lesbian newsweekly, posted with permission of the author:


Big Lou: The Life and Career of Louis Edmonds by Craig Hamrick, iUniverse Press, March 2003, softcover, $14.95

     To fans of the daytime soaps Dark Shadows and All My Children, Louis Edmonds was a superstar. But few others have heard of this journeyman actor, even though he worked steadily for 45 years.

     Louis Edmonds (1923-2001) lived for the theatre and had hundreds of roles on the stage and in early live TV. A tall, imposing, aristocratic man, he was a grand, old school actor. Had he been born twenty years earlier, he could have been one of Hollywood's great character people. But when Edmonds entered the theatre in the early 1950s, method acting was all the rage. Many classically trained actors were relegated to appearing with small theatre companies around the country, working steadily but getting little recognition. Though occasional small roles on television raised his profile slightly, Louis Edmonds never achieved stardom on any level. That changed in 1966, when he was cast in a new daytime drama called Dark Shadows.

     Dark Shadows began as fairly traditional soap opera fare. About six months into it's network run, the struggling show took a sharp turn and began presenting ghost stories. This seemed to attract some attention, so, in April 1967, Dark Shadows presented viewers with Barnabas Collins (Jonathan Frid), daytime television's first bona fide, blood sucking vampire! Almost instantly Dark Shadows shot from the bottom to the top of the daytime ratings. The show became a pop culture phenomenon, and for the first time in his career, Louis Edmonds found himself thrust into the spotlight.

     The show's bizarre combination of horror movie cliches and soap opera melodrama was perfect or his grand, slightly over the top style of acting. Louis stayed with the show for it's entire five year run, and appeared with the rest of the cast in MGM's spin-off feature film House of Dark Shadows in 1970.

     Louis had a second brush with fame. In 1979 he began a 16 year run on All My Children. He made his role, carnival barker turned dapper aristocrat Langley Wallingford his own. It was a larger than life role that suited him perfectly, and he played it with gusto, earning himself three Emmy nominations along the way and millions of fans.

     His All My Children fans included TV legend Carol Burnett, who, in 1983, asked the producers to write her into the show. For one week, Burnett appeared as Verla Grubbs, Langley's long lost daughter. They made a wonderful comedy team, and the show's ratings soared. All My Children was his moment in the sun.

     Louis Edmonds died in March 2001 after an extended illness. He might have been forgotten, as so many daytime actors are. But now, Edmonds is the subject of the first full length biography of a soap star.

     Craig Hamrick's Big Lou is a superbly written study of Edmonds' life and career. Hamrick, a New York based writer and freelance journalist, was a close friend of Edmonds during the last eight years of the actor's life. Because of this, Big Lou could have been nothing more than a shallow, worshipful valentine to Edmonds. But the courageous Hamrick, though clearly in awe of his subject, is not afraid to expose a few warts.

     The book serves as both a biography and a career study. After some background information on Edmonds' childhood in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the book follows his years as a drama student at Carnegie Technical Institute in Pittsburgh (Jack Klugman and Nancy Marchand were classmates) where he discovered his attraction to men. In the 1940s, there was no gay rights movement, no community to speak of and no positive role models for young gays to look up to. Though he did not officially come out, the enormously self confident Edmonds quietly accepted his sexuality and pursued relationships with men

     He could be quite arrogant, Hamrick explains. Though he worked steadily in regional theatre and had roles in live TV, he was far from a well known actor. He had some bitterness over this. In the company of his theatre friends, he often put on airs and played "star".  He was a superb actor with a strong stage presence, but his arrogance may have done him in. He was aware of his talent and let numerous opportunities pass him by as he waited for "them" to call "him". He was too proud to pound the pavement, and he resented agents.  He felt they took more than their fair share of his pay while he actually showed up and did the work. He often refused to deal with them. Had he "played the game", his career might well have expanded beyond the limited range of daytime TV.

     He was also touchy about money. Hamrick documents his two long term relationships, both of which ended over disagreements about money.

     Louis Edmonds was an enormously talented man who was often his own worst enemy. This led to severe battles with alcohol and depression. Hamrick relates all of this, never losing sight of his own love and affection for the man.

     In the 1980s, Louis Edmonds watched sadly as his second lover, actor Bryce Holman, and his young nephew both succumbed to AIDS. He had seen he struggle for gay rights grow into a major movement. Perhaps inspired by this, he finally, in his 70s, publicly came out at a Dark Shadows fan gathering in the mid-1990s. He also appeared in Next Year in Jerusalem, a gay independent film in 1997, his final role.

     His final years were spent battling a variety of illnesses, including throat cancer, which robbed him of his career and ultimately of his life. He bore his illnesses with a quiet dignity. His final days were spent at his beloved country home, The Rookery, tending his garden and being visited by old friends and fans.

     Craig Hamrick's Big Lou is a lovely and loving tribute to a very complicated but talented man. At no time does Hamrick's friendship with Edmonds impair his ability tell the truth about his dear friend.  His love for his subject comes through on every page. Hamrick, himself a wide eyed semi-closeted gay man fom Kansas when he first  arrived in New York City, is introduced by Edmonds to art, theatre and culture. These memories are lovely to read. It is clear that Louis Edmonds had a profound influence on Craig Hamrick's life.

       Illustrated with many fascinating photographs, some from Edmonds' personal collection, some from the theatre archives of the New York City Public Library, the book is a fluidly written easy read. Big Lou gives a fine, neglected artist his due. Without it, Louis Edmonds may have been nothing more than a vague footnote in theatre and television history.

     Thanks to Craig Hamrick, he will not be forgotten.

     Big Lou is available at Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble.com. Dark Shadows, featuring Louis Edmonds, can be seen weekday mornings on the Sci-Fi Channel, and is available on DVD through  MPI Home Video.
           
                             by David Nahmod

8348
Calendar Events / Announcements '03 I / Re:OT - *sniff*
« on: May 26, 2003, 12:48:38 AM »
That's true, Patti.  And I hope you feel better soon.

Cassandra_Blair asked something very intriguing (hope you don't mind, CB!) that could be opened to discussion...

Do you think Buffy will hold up as well as DS has-- or will its fans be as loyal-- 30+ years down the line?


(The *sniff*, btw, is cuz Anya went to bunny heaven in the finale [though to her I suppose that would be hellish ;)].)

8349
Testing. 1, 2, 3... / Re:QUESTION FOR MIDNITE,OR DOM OR MB/OT
« on: May 26, 2003, 12:25:56 AM »
(I never noticed that before...I really don't know what all the buttons are about...)
Thanks honey :-*

You're welcome, sweetie. :D

8350
Testing. 1, 2, 3... / Re:QUESTION FOR MIDNITE,OR DOM OR MB/OT
« on: May 25, 2003, 05:19:14 PM »
Now I can't show you like MB...make SURE you have :
[direction]   [/direction] (bracket, bracket, what you want it to do, bracket / (backslash) bracket direction bracket

You can do it too, Patti.  To demonstrate how to type a certain code and have it show up in your post, surround your entire demonstration with the "code tags" that are available same as the others.  Just click on the white page with the pound sign to add the code tags to your message.

Luv,  M.

8351
Testing. 1, 2, 3... / Re:QUESTION FOR MIDNITE,OR DOM OR MB/OT
« on: May 24, 2003, 04:37:24 PM »
i was wondering
how you get a whole sentence to move
across the screen ( like for example when
say the words " Happy Birthday"???

Good morning, Annie,

When you've got the blank reply window open, there are 3 rows of powder blue squares above it.  Click the one in the top row that has a black arrow followed by an "M".  That will add to your reply this
Code: [Select]
[move][/move]
Type "Happy Birthday" between the 2 tags, so the whole thing will look like this
Code: [Select]
[move]Happy Birthday[/move] and after it's posted you'll have this

Happy Birthday
Hope that helped! :D

8352
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Angelique's Portrait
« on: May 22, 2003, 07:11:07 PM »
LOL, thanks, Gerard.  In Netscape you don't have to highlight, silly me.

8353
Current Talk '03 I / Re:OT - spoiler text
« on: May 22, 2003, 05:18:12 PM »
A large blank space is all I'm getting, even when I move the cursor.

Don't tell me.  Let me guess. It's just an IE thang..... ::)

Ack, I don't see the text in IE either. [undb]

8354
Current Talk '03 I / OT - spoiler text
« on: May 22, 2003, 03:54:57 PM »
And thanks for an opportunity to show everyone how the new Spoiler Text feature acts. :D

I love it.  On some other posting boards you have to move the cursor around to find the spoilers, and sometimes you find that a large blank space is just a blank space.  If you've been to The Bronze pb you know what I'm talking about.

8355
Current Talk '03 I / Re:Angelique's Portrait
« on: May 21, 2003, 11:26:19 PM »
Well, believe it or not, the writers did research obscure Maine laws for the witchcraft trials that took place on the show. So, they were motivated when the spirit moved them. Unfortunately, it didn't move them often enough. ;)

Don't get me started on how it never moooved them ( ;) to sheenasma) to do any medical research.  How ridiculous was it for Julia, a medical doctor, to hover over a feverish baby Joseph while he's wrapped in a wool blanket?  Okay, so he was the wool blanket, but still...

Quote
Even the most dimwitted attorney imaginable could have gotten Philip off had his case ever actually gone to trial. [lghy]

Except Peter Bradford, snort.

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