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Messages - Gothick

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3646
Current Talk '09 I / Horror Hosts and the DS Phenomenon
« on: March 19, 2009, 12:20:51 AM »
Dear Fans,

Last night I played a couple of the interview segments on the DVD set, Dark Shadows The Beginning: vol. 5.  One of  the interviews was with Leonard Wolf, who I last caught sight of back in the Seventies on a late night talk show with Peter Cushing and Forry Ackerman.  Anyhow, Leonard Wolf comes in to try to explain why the DS pop cultural phenomenon hit so big in the late Sixties.  He contrasts the Fifties, which he describes as a culturally and psychologically "desiccated" era, with the Sixties which exploded as the decade wore on with ever more violent and jarring arcs of revolutionary ferment on every level.

After playing the interview, I was thinking about the late 1950s as the period when the vogue for "Horror Hosts" became a phenomenon of its own.  I was trying to recall when Vampira's show was running--I think it was quite early, possibly around 1955?  From the little I know, it seems as if Zacherley's show became the first really big instance of this type of show.

Although the horror hosts and their "creature features" were a very different type of show from our beloved DS, it does seem to have paved the way for other types of series such as Boris Karloff's Thriller and the Addams Family.  Having an afternoon supernatural series looks from this point of view like the next logical step, although of course it was a very radical step for the production team to take.

I like the interviews with the ABC publicity guy who keeps remarking how the network suits had no idea what DS was about, how it should be handled, or really just why it was so popular.

Just a few thoughts--those of you who have done more research on horror hosts might have something to add.  Interestingly, I don't recall horror host shows in my childhood in Maryland until the early 1970s.  In the Sixties, the airings of horror movies I used to watch were not hosted, although they had spooky music and imagery to introduce each week's offering.

G.

3647
Calendar Events / Announcements '09 I / Re: New Dark Shadows site
« on: March 18, 2009, 08:02:01 PM »
Great site, and I only had time to look at some of the Daughters of Darkness shots...

I did spot a typo; in the set-up line in italics on the front page, "unleash" appears as "unlease."

Best wishes,

G.

3648
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Dark Shadows: the First Year?
« on: March 18, 2009, 07:55:37 PM »
KLS' PomPress books are always printed on glossy paper with loads of beautifully printed color photos, and the business managed to do this because all the books were produced in, I believe, a printing firm in South Korea. 

I wonder whether an attempt was made to do "The First Year" through PomPress.  I have heard of others who tried to get their books published with that firm, only to be told that Pom isn't doing any more DS (or vintage television, or whatever) titles.  Then a year later KLS announces her NEXT book.  sigh.

I'll order the book but with the expectation that it will be printed on a lower grade paper which means a lot of detail will be lost in the photos.  At least I can hope that there are no distortions in the photos due to the printer messing up scans of old pictures.  This has happened in more than one Shadows themed book I can think of...

G.

3649
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Dark Shadows: the First Year?
« on: March 18, 2009, 05:49:48 PM »
Hey darlin',

I should have included this link in my original post, but y'know, Momma always said I was a bit "slow" ...

http://www.darkshadowsfestival.com/page06.htm

It doesn't say what the format is (i.e. glossy paper or plain) but it does state "full color cover"!  There were a few color candid shots from 1966 included in some previous PomPress books.

The Ann Wilson episode guide I use is in a volume entitled Dark Shadows Memories which is supposed to be an update of the old "My Scrapbook Memories" but is a completely new work.

And I was wrong about the Thayer David antiquing series--I think that may be in the DS Almanac, *original* edition.  If any Thayer David fans need me to confirm this, just let me know.    (Seems to be just a few of us here--we need to help one another out!)

cheers, G.

3650
Current Talk '09 I / Dark Shadows: the First Year?
« on: March 18, 2009, 03:55:54 PM »
Has anyone on here ever purchased the book Dark Shadows: the First Year?  I saw an ad for it on one of the Laura Collins DVDs last night and am intrigued.  Great cover, and the photo selection looks boss.

This one is available only through the DS Festival--and for all I know may now be OP.  I think the book came out around 2007--maybe earlier.

G.

3651
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Question about Quentin and ratings
« on: March 17, 2009, 08:36:36 PM »
Thanks so much, MB!  Now of course I remember that panel--derived from a favorite Barnabas publicity shot...

I seem to remember thinking that one "interpretation" of this image was that it wasn't Q's portrait, but his phantom that was looking out from a distance--rather like the representation of the ghosts in the old film The Innocents (with Deborah Kerr).

Thanks for the Tuesday afternoon treat!

G.

3652
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Question about Quentin and ratings
« on: March 17, 2009, 08:04:40 PM »
Thanks for that info, Doctor and K9.  How intriguing that it was almost exactly 38 years ago!

G.

3653
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Question about Quentin and ratings
« on: March 17, 2009, 05:54:12 PM »
Thanks, Arashi.  I gave my copy of that book away (wasn't the artist's name Baldwin?), even though the strips were excellent--I've been getting more draconian about what I keep in my old age.

But now that you mention it, I do seem to recall Quentin popping up as a portrait...

cheers, Steve

3654
Current Talk '09 I / Re: Question about Quentin and ratings
« on: March 17, 2009, 03:51:10 PM »
Don't forget all of Quentin's "as played by Engelbert Humperdinck" appearances in those dreadful Gold Key comic books.

Quentin looked Tasmanian, Julia resembled a retired drag queen badly in need of chin surgery, Prof. Stokes appeared to be semi-batrachian...  I'm not sure what to say about Barn's portrayal in those comics, except that as I recall it, he was drawn looking more like Tony George than Jonathan Frid.

For some reason, Quentin never appeared in the vastly superior (artistically and story-wise) newspaper comics--I suppose because DC Prod had only licensed the characters of Barnabas, Liz, Carolyn and Angelique, and the setting of Collinwood (which was the movie Collinwood, not the actual estate we all know and love) for appearance in those comics.

G.

3655
Hmmm.  Given the caption, to which my twisted mind imputes salacious overtones, and Vicki's expression, I had some thoughts too, but unfortunately, they're not suitable for the readership of a family-friendly venue *evil leer*.

I watched a little of Laura, Liz, and Roger in January of '67 this morning--and Vicki was on a date with Frank--and I just thought again how much I LOVE this period of the series.

G.

3656
Current Talk '06 I / Re: The Levithins Are The Best Time Period!!!
« on: March 16, 2009, 07:32:43 PM »
Kitty IS the Root of all evil.

Which explains why we love her so much.

G.

3657
Yes, I meant paper--forgive the egregious typo.

Perhaps surprisingly, I feel moved to defend the PomPress books.  I would say the written content of the books is uneven, not one hundred percent brilliant or totally worthless.  The text in the books that I use most frequently and keep on a reference shelf with my DVDs is the episode guide from the revised DS Almanac (if I am remembering correctly), which I believe was the work of Ann Wilson.  Other pieces I have gotten special enjoyment from include Lara Parker's essay "Out of Angelique's Shadow," KLS' interview with David Henesy, Alex Moltke's preface to one of the books (in which I think she described Grayson as, I'm paraphrasing, "Auntie Mame meets Charles Addams", and wrote fondly of Thayer David), and a two or three page series of photographs documenting Thayer David's trip to an actual Manhattan antique shop in the very first of the books, which unfortunately has been unavailable for many years.

There are no doubt mistakes in the books--my Sun is in Leo so I'm too sloppy myself to be bothered by those.  I see the expressions of "faulty memory syndrome" and all-out blatant mistakes as the literary counterpart to all the flubs on the original series.

These books have given me many hours of pleasure over the years.  I've always found them to be reasonably priced, and before I was able to have the luxury of owning the show in home entertainment formats, it sometimes gave me comfort at the end of a particularly weary day to take one of the books down and commune with my childhood favorites.

As for Mr. Thompson's work, I will leave that to others to review, as I doubt whether further comment from me would be welcome here.

Best,

Gothick

3658
MacFarland's books are always expensive.  They cater mainly to libraries, especially academic libraries.  I find that their books are always laid out in a very workmanlike fashion, usually with a lower grade of people and black and white photographs that are in text.  No color photos, no glossy paper, and nothing remotely exciting about the look of the books (I work in an academic library so I have had the chance to peruse many of them).

And I seriously doubt whether this title is going to make a dent in the reputation of the PomPress books as the go-to source for documentation on DS.  Didn't PomPress also do a book on the Night Stalker films and series, too?

cheers, G.

3659
Current Talk '09 I / The Beauty of Grayson Hall
« on: March 12, 2009, 03:01:47 PM »
Hell's Bells!  what a GORGEOUS portrait of our Beloved Grayson on today's capture!  I'm fainting in the aisles!  Stagger-drunk with Beauty! 

My hat, were I wearing one, would be off to the Most Magnificent and Munificent Mysterious Benefactor!  Huzzah!

gasping for breath, hand clutched dramatically to throat,

G.

3660
I'll have to check out that article, but I'm more of a fan of Sixties TV.  Besides DS (which, even though it lasted into 1971, was, to my own mind, very much firmly in the zeitgeist of the Sixties), the shows I've been watching in the past year have included Boris Karloff's Thriller, The Wild Wild West, T.H.E. Cat, The Addams Family, and recently a couple of episodes of 77 Sunset Strip (I think technically those were from '59, as was another series I've been enjoying--Yancy Derringer).

I associate the early Seventies with the rise of Norman Lear via the hugely popular All in the Family (which I couldn't stand), and Good Times and Maude (both of which I found very amusing).  I recall endless newspaper and magazine articles of the day applauding the way Lear pushed a new level of frankness onto the tube with the subject matter and writing style of his shows.

There was nothing remotely "groovy" about this new trend, or about the other big hits of the Seventies (even Sonny & Cher's show was more glam than groovy) so it sounds like a case of someone who wasn't around blurring their decades.

G.

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